Support of ISIS in North Carolina, USA

The video was removed but the evidence remains. Like ISIS supporters in Ferguson, Chicago, Brooklyn, Detroit, Jersey, California, Minnesota and DC. Has the FBI found out who this guy is? via Alternative Angle.

American supporter of ISIS

A video clip, called “Billion Muslims to Support the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant,” bring together messages of support of ISIS from people around the globe, including USA, Britain, France, Spain, Italy, Belgium, Australia, Palestine and other Arab states.
The sympathizers of ISIS hold posters proclaiming their allegiance to the Islamic organization and its leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.
One of them is apparently an American national, who is pointing (minute: 03:20) with the forefinger as an indication of affirmation of Allah’s Oneness and holding a poster, which reads in mixed Arabic and English the following: “American support of the Islamic State ISIS. North Carolina. USA.”
The inept media won’t report on the growing support of ISIS by Muslims in the U.S., particularly black Muslims, as it doesn’t support their narrative. The video was released in June so they’ve had plenty of time to investigate, but haven’t.

North Carolina: Hearing delayed for Muslim who deserted USMC twice (updated)

via Hearing set for US Marine accused of desertion; claimed extremists kidnapped him in Iraq | Fox News.

CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. – Military officials have scheduled a hearing this week for a Marine accused of faking his own kidnapping in Iraq as well as failing to return to his base after visiting relatives in Utah.

A statement from Camp Lejeune on Tuesday said the hearing for Cpl. Wassef Ali Hassoun is scheduled for Thursday. A Marine Corps spokesman says the results of the hearing will determine what action will be taken.

Hassoun disappeared twice from the military — first in June 2004 in a purported kidnapping by Islamic extremists, and in January 2005 when he failed to return to Camp Lejeune.

Hassoun turned himself in to military authorities in June and is in custody pending an investigation and decisions on the charges against him.

As was reported in July, Muslim who deserted Marine Corps back in U.S. custody:

It is unclear where Hassoun, 34, has spent the past nine years after disappearing during a visit with relatives in Utah in December 2004. Nor is it known why he chose to turn himself in now. He was born in Lebanon and is a naturalized American citizen.

He enlisted in the Marine Corps in January 2002 and was trained as a motor vehicle operator. At the time of his disappearance from a Marine camp in Fallujah in western Iraq in June 2004 he was serving as an Arabic translator. That was a particularly difficult year for the Marines in Iraq. In April they launched an offensive to retake Fallujah from Islamic extremists but were ordered to pull back, only to launch a second offensive in November that succeeded in regaining control of the city but at the expense of dozens of Marine lives.

Seven days after his June 2004 disappearance, a photo of a blindfolded Hassoun with a sword poised above his head turned up on Al-Jazeera television. A group called the National Islamic Resistance/1920 Revolution Brigade claimed to be holding him captive.

On July 8, 2004, Hassoun contacted American officials in Beirut, Lebanon, claiming to have been kidnapped. He was returned to the US and eventually to Camp Lejeune. After a Navy investigation, the military charged Hassoun with desertion, loss of government property, theft of a military firearm for allegedly leaving the Fallujah camp with a 9 mm service pistol, and theft of a Humvee.

Shortly after his return to the US, Hassoun said in a public statement that he had been captured by insurgents in Iraq and was still a loyal Marine.

In the initial months following his return to Lejeune, Hassoun was not held in confinement because charges had not yet been brought against him. He was considered non-deployable until the case was resolved, but he was allowed to make personal trips. Prior to his disappearance in December 2004 he had taken leave twice without incident after he returned from Lebanon.

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p style=”padding-left:30px;”>A January 2005 hearing on the matter was canceled when Hassoun failed to return to Camp Lejeune from his Utah visit. His commanders then officially classified him as a deserter, authorizing civilian police to apprehend him.

Update: Court decision delayed on Marine’s Iraq vanishing

CAMP LEJEUNE — A defense attorney said Thursday that a Marine accused of deserting his unit a decade ago in Iraq was kept in Lebanon for eight years while he faced a military trial there.

The Marine officer presiding over the hearing for Cpl. Wassef Hassoun adjourned the proceeding for at least a week to allow defense attorneys to translate Lebanese documents they say support his case.

The hearing officer, Lt. Col. Scott W. Martin, will eventually recommend whether Hassoun should face a military trial on charges including desertion as part of the Article 32 process, the military equivalent of a grand jury. A Marine general will have the final say on whether to try Hassoun.

Martin has given the defense at least until Aug. 27 to translate the documents, and no new court date has been set.

Defense attorney Haytham Faraj says Hassoun, 34, was kept in Lebanon for years for court proceedings triggered by U.S. accusations that he had deserted. Faraj said documents show Hassoun was tried and convicted by a Lebanese military court on charges that mirror the U.S. desertion charges. He said the Lebanese government tried Hassoun at the behest of the U.S. but did not elaborate.

Military prosecutors say Hassoun’s whereabouts were unknown for years until he contacted U.S. officials in 2013.

Faraj said that as soon as the court proceedings in Lebanon ended, Hassoun contacted U.S. officials saying: “I need to get back to the U.S. The Lebanese have been holding me.”

The case began in June of 2004 when Hassoun disappeared from a base in Fallujah in western Iraq. About a week later, he appeared in a photo purportedly taken by insurgents. Hassoun was blindfolded and had a sword poised above his head.

Hassoun, who was born in Lebanon and is a naturalized American citizen, turned up days later at the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon and said he had been kidnapped by Islamic extremists and held for 19 days. A group called the National Islamic Resistance/1920 Revolution Brigade claimed responsibility for his capture.

“It strains logic that he would flee and then turn himself in to U.S. authorities weeks later,” Faraj said.

But the military doubted his story, and he was brought back to the U.S. He was allowed to visit relatives in Utah in December 2004 when he disappeared again. A hearing, called an Article 32 proceeding, was canceled in January 2005. His commanders then classified him as a deserter.

Faraj said little about the purported 2004 kidnapping other than Hassoun was able to get away from his captors by using unique skills he developed as a serviceman and translator familiar with local Iraqis.

Prosecutors argue that there is overwhelming circumstantial evidence that Hassoun was unhappy and left the Marines in Iraq and later fled to Lebanon in 2004. They gave the hearing officer statements by witnesses who said Hassoun was unhappy with his deployment and how the U.S. was interrogating Iraqis. Witnesses told investigators that Hassoun said he was unwilling to shoot back at Iraqis and would shoot over their heads instead.

Prosecutors say Hassoun inquired about procedures for leaving the base in Fallujah, packed a bag and withdrew hundreds of dollars shortly before his disappearance from his unit.

“What we do have is circumstantial evidence, and that evidence is overwhelming,” said Capt. Christopher Nassar, one of the prosecutors.

Military officials say that around the time of his 2004 disappearance, a marriage for Hassoun had been arranged with a woman in Lebanon. They are now married and have a son who has dual U.S. and Lebanese citizenship.

Nassar said that even if Hassoun were put on trial in Lebanon, it doesn’t alter the Marines’ jurisdiction over the desertion case.

Hassoun enlisted in the Marine Corps in January 2002 and was trained as a motor vehicle operator. He was serving as an Arabic translator at the time of his disappearance in June 2004.

Retired Maj. Gen. Walt Huffman, a Texas Tech University law professor who previously served as the Army’s top lawyer, said he finds it odd that a foreign government would try an American serviceman on charges of deserting the U.S. military.

For example, in Germany and Japan, where there are U.S. military bases, local authorities can try U.S. servicemen on certain criminal offenses, but they’d have no interest in pursuing military charges such as desertion.

“I find that very unusual,” he said.

In desertion cases, he said it can be difficult to prove the serviceman planned never to return.

  1. “The hardest thing is proving that they intended to stay away permanently,” he said.

Brooklyn: Muslim who pledged allegiance to ISIS arrested at JFK returning from Lebanon

via Suspected American militant who pledged allegiance to ISIS held without bail after being arrested at JFK – NY Daily News.

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A Brooklyn judge ordered a suspected American militant who pledged allegiance to the terrorist leader of ISIS held without bail after he was arrested at Kennedy Airport, the Daily News has learned.

FBI agents nabbed Donald Ray Morgan, a 44-year-old ex-convict from North Carolina, on Aug. 2 when he returned to the United States after an eight-month stay in Lebanon, where his wife lives.

Morgan, who has a previous conviction for firing a gun, had allegedly been brokering deals for military-grade weapons and ammo in his home state and was indicted for being a felon in possession of a firearm.

But what caught counter-terrorism agents attention were his chilling Twitter rants from the Middle East under the alias “Abu Omar al Amreeki.”

Assistant Brooklyn U.S. Attorney Nadia Moore presented a sampling of the evidence to Magistrate Ramon Reyes at a bail hearing last week to support her argument that the alleged gun trafficker was too dangerous to return to North Carolina on his own.

“It’s possible that he traffics in guns to people in this organization (ISIS),” Moore said in Brooklyn Federal Court.

Besides pledging allegiance to chief ISIS thug Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, his tweets strongly suggested he may have been preparing for jihad in Syria, Iraq or possibly the states, law enforcement officials feared.

He also referred to himself as a mujahedeen, or jihad fighter.

Federal defender Peter Kirchheimer said there was no evidence Morgan is a member of ISIS or had provided material support.

But the judge said the tweets had “clearly implied to me that he is trying to go to Syria or Iraq as the next step and trying to be actively engaged.”

 More:

 And more via, Donald Ray Morgan, the 44-Year-Old American Who Loved ISIS:

The attorney asked the agent if pledging allegiance to the head of ISIS is a crime.

“It depends how you can take his pledge,” the agent said. “I don’t have any evidence that he is currently a member [of ISIS] except that he’s pledging allegiance to it.”

The attorney asked, “Can you give me one example of one act that he committed to help ISIS? Like give somebody money, a plane ticket, how to shoot a gun?”

The agent said, “Not to my knowledge.”

The agent added, “He also indicated…that he was aware of how these interviews go and he would not in any way do anything to incriminate himself.”

The agent went a step too far in suggesting that Morgan’s penny ante gun dealing suggested he might be providing weapons to ISIS.

ISIS hardly has need of a couple of AK-47s and sniper rifles after acquiring untold quantities of abandoned weapons that we had provided to the Iraqi army.

The attorney maintained that Morgan’s beliefs did not make him a danger. The agent maintained that at least one of the tweets “implies to me an interest in trying to travel to Syria.”

The judge, Ramon Reyes, agreed about the tweet.

“That implies clearly to me that he is trying to go to Syria or Iraq,” the judge said. “I believe this is going to be the next step and trying to be actively engaged.”

He’ll do time for the gun charge and recruit more convicts to Islam and ISIS.

Detroit: Muslim cleric popular with ISIS terrorists faces new restrictions

Apparently preaching jihad and communicating with Muslim terrorists is not a violation of his probation. via Cleric popular with militants faces new restrictions. h/t Atlas Shrugs who asks: How many more imams are advocating for jihad in the cause of Islam? We ask, how many imams aren’t?

DETROIT — A federal judge has cracked down on the travel and computer activities of a Dearborn cleric popular worldwide with ISIS, the extremist militant group that announced last week the formation of an Islamic state in Iraq and Syria.

U.S. District Judge Gerald Rosen ordered that Ahmad Jebril, 43, stay within the eastern half of Michigan and tell his probation officer about his activity on social media accounts, if requested.

(Photo: U.S. Probation Office for Eastern District of Michigan)

(Photo: U.S. Probation Office for Eastern District of Michigan)

Jebril, who is on probation until March after serving 6½ years in prison on fraud convictions, has become the most popular religious figure for Western fighters flocking to Syria to battle its government — and continues to gain fans online who sympathize with ISIS, the group that now calls itself the Islamic State.

The group has drawn increasing concern since it seized control of Mosul, Iraq, and declared last week an Islamic caliphate, telling Muslims around the world to come and support them. The Islamic State also is active in Syria; al-Qaida distanced itself from the group ISIS in February, saying it was too extreme.

The court order doesn’t restrict what Jebril can say online but requires him to get approval to use any computer equipment and to hand over his passwords for all accounts, among other restrictions. Rosen wrote that there will be zero tolerance of any infractions.

Rosen’s June 5 order came after a probation report in May that said Jebril violated the terms of his probation by lying about the location of a post office box in Dearborn Heights and not telling authorities he was speaking in November at two universities and a mosque in North Carolina.

The probation report, filed the week after a Detroit Free Press report detailed how Jebril is popular with Western fighters with the militant group ISIS, also noted that Jebril told his probation officer he was going to Raleigh, N.C., on Nov. 21-23, 2013, “for a short vacation to visit friends.”

But the probation officer found out he was instead visiting to speak about Islam at East Carolina University, North Carolina State University and the Islamic Association of Raleigh. The officer said Jebril was unable to prove who paid for his trips.

The Islamic Association of Raleigh has been a source of jihad and terror for nearly three decades.

Rosen’s order now requires Jebril to be monitored using GPS technology.

The order also said Jebril “shall only access a computer approved by the U.S. Probation Department” and can be subjected to searches of his home and vehicles.

Among the Western fighters surveyed, 52% of Jebril’s followers on Twitter are with ISIS, and 56% of his Facebook likes are with the group, according to the report.

“He has been directly in touch with a number of foreign fighters, even with the families of fallen foreign fighters,” said Peter Neumann, a professor of security studies at King’s College in London who is director of the International Centre and one of three authors of the report.

In December, Jebril sent a direct message on Twitter to a family member of an ISIS fighter from England killed in Syria.

“When I read of him today, it made we weep,” Jebril wrote.

 

Video: Radical Islam in North Carolina

via Rowan Free Press h/t Diane

Dave Gaubatz speaks about Radical Islam in North Carolina.

Related:

Muslim Mafia: First look at undercover infiltration of CAIR

Muslim Mafia: More excerpts from inside CAIR

Exposing Mosques in the U.S.: Interview with Dave Gaubatz

North Carolina: Muslim arrested, stabbed wife to death

Honor killing? via Rocky Mount man charged in wife’s death :: WRAL.com. h/t Diversity’s Darkside

Rocky Mount, N.C. — A man faces a first-degree murder charge after he allegedly stabbed his wife to death at their Rocky Mount home over the weekend, police said Monday.

Jihad Hamdan, 26, surrendered to authorities Saturday night after police were called to a condominium at 244 Pintail Lane, where they found Alia Harvi Odeh, 23, stabbed.

Investigators said the couple was married but “apart” at the time of the stabbing. They have not released a motive for the crime.

If they were apart, was he feeling shamed? Was this an Islamic honor killing? Will cops even entertain the possibility?

Sources say police responded to a domestic disturbance call at the home Friday night, and neighbors said they heard screams around 10 p.m. Saturday from who they believe was Odeh’s mother.

“We started hearing yelling – it sounded female – and my husband got up and looked out the front door and noticed that – I believe it was the young lady’s mother yelling hysterical,” said Sally Jones, who lives next to the couple.

Jones said the couple and their three young children moved into the home about six months ago and that the family was nice and pleasant.

Neighbors said they believe the children – all under age 6 – were home at the time of the crime.

Hamdan, who was being held without bond in the Nash County Jail Monday, worked at a local convenience store with his wife’s brother.

The brother said Monday that he was unaware of any marital problems and that he never knew Hamdan to be violent with his sister.

One of Odeh’s last Facebook posts in January asked friends: “If I died tomorrow, what is the one thing you would always remember about me?”

Her husband’s response: “Your beautiful heart. I love you always and forever, you’re my first love and my everything.”

North Carolina: Appeals court upholds terrorism convictions of 3 Muslims

via Appeals court upholds NC terrorism convictions :: WRAL.com.

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A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the convictions of three members of a North Carolina terror ring who plotted to attack the U.S. Marine Corps Base in Quantico, Va., and targets abroad.

Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, Hysen Sherifi and Ziyad Yaghi were convicted in 2011 after two FBI informants testified that they were part of a home-grown terror group that raised money, stockpiled weapons, took trips overseas and trained for jihadist attacks against perceived enemies of Islam. They were given prison terms ranging from 15 years to 45 years.

On appeal, the men argued that they never conspired to actually commit terrorist acts — they only talked about their beliefs, and such expression is protected by the First Amendment.

“Of course, their argument ignores that the jury found — as it was required to do in order to convict — that the appellants had, in fact, agreed to take action in furtherance of violent jihad,” appeals court Judge Robert King wrote in the unanimous opinion.

“Their convictions rest not only on their agreement to join one another in a common terrorist scheme, but also on a series of calculated overt acts in furtherance of that scheme,” King wrote.

Sherifi’s attorney, John Clark Fischer, said he disagreed with the court’s conclusion and expects to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

“We’ll see if the Supreme Court is interested in deciding the difference between talk and action,” he said.

Fischer, who described his client as “a terrorist wannabe,” said he believes attorneys for the other men also are likely to appeal. Those lawyers did not immediately return telephone messages.

The appeals court also found no merit in a claim that evidence against the men was insufficient.

“The evidence, though largely circumstantial, was nevertheless substantial,” the court said. “That evidence readily supports the determination that a rational finder of fact could (and in fact did) deem the evidence adequate to support each conviction beyond a reasonable doubt.”

Yaghi was convicted of conspiracy to provide material support to terrorism and conspiracy to carry out attacks overseas. Sherifi was convicted of both crimes, two counts of firearms possession, and conspiracy to kill federal officers or employees for plotting the Quantico attack. Hassan was convicted of providing material support to terrorists, but acquitted of a charge of conspiracy to carry out attacks overseas.

Sherifi was sentenced to 45 years in prison; Yaghi got nearly 32 years; and Hassan was sentenced to 15 years. They argued that the sentences were unreasonable, but the appeals court disagreed.

 WRAL forgets to mention this about Sherifi:

A judge gave four life sentences Friday to a man already facing decades in federal prison for his role in a North Carolina terror plot.

Hysen Sherifi lectured federal Judge Earl Britt about Islamic teachings and warned the judge he faced damnation at his sentencing hearing.

After Sherifi was convicted, prosecutors say he convinced his brother Shkumbin and former special education teacher Nevine Aly Elshiekh to help behead three confidential informants from his trial. He also wanted a fourth man killed who he said had defrauded his family out of more than $30,000.

Before Hysen Sherifi was sentenced, he lectured the judge about Islamic teachings.

Read more at North Carolina: 3 Muslims sentenced in plot to behead terror witnesses

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