Philadelphia aka ‘Muslim Town’: A look inside

The Washington Post has a writer dedicated to Islam. In her title she claims to take a look inside “Muslim Town.” It’s a very shallow look.

Source: ‘Muslim Town’: A look inside Philadelphia’s thriving Muslim culture – The Washington Post

In the 1960s, the term “American Muslim” tended to refer to members of the Nation of Islam, a black nationalist group that thrived during the tumultuous years of the civil rights movement. But shifting demographics have altered that image, which has been replaced by portrayals of Muslims as immigrants — stereotypes fueled by a new set of politics and national security anxieties.

Now, only about 9 percent of America’s Muslims are black and native-born.

Not so in Philadelphia, where local Muslim leaders say the majority of Muslims are still black.

Today, Masjidullah is one of only three mosques out of 37 in Philadelphia that are tied to the W.D. Mohammed tradition. The larger Muslim population has diversified, and some say W.D. Mohammed’s teachings are no longer relevant. But the legacy lives on in the city’s culture and politics and has helped define a modern-day Philadelphia that Muslim leaders say remains a magnet for Muslim immigrants and new converts.

Once dubbed “Muslim Town” in a Philadelphia Inquirer editorial, Philadelphia is a city that appears uniquely — or at least relatively — at ease with its long-standing Muslim community… [editorial not readily found online]

In Philadelphia, there is a plethora of Muslim-owned businesses, an Islamic history museum, and numerous Muslim community organizations and charitable initiatives. There is a Muslim city council member and a Muslim state senator; the chairman of the city Board of Commissioners is Muslim, and there has been a Muslim police chief. The Muslim holidays of Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Kabir are observed holidays within the Philadelphia school system, and 2017 was the fifth year in a row that City Hall hosted an annual Iftar dinner in celebration of the holy month of Ramadan.

“Everywhere you go, Muslims in the bank, Muslims in the hospital, in the police department,” said Shabazz.

“It so happens that even the Christian people are giving their kids Arabic names like Ayesha, Khadija, Khalil,” said Ahmad Nuruddin, a native-born black Philadelphian who converted to Islam in his 20s and now serves as a leader within the city’s Ahmadiyya Muslim community, part of a predominantly South Asian sect.


A deeper look at Philly’s Muslim Town can be found in various posts in the Creeping Sharia archives, here.

In a 2014 Inquirer article we learn more about Philly’s growing Muslim presence:

…to get a look-see at the origins of Islam in Philadelphia you’d have to go back to March of 1954 when Minister Malcolm X arrived in Philadelphia to help “energize” the Nation of Islam’s local Temple #12.

Going even further back you discover the West Philadelphia based Quba Inc. (formally the International Muslim Brotherhood). In the late 1940’s no one could have imagined the group’s future contribution to the growth of Islam in Philadelphia.

The Muslim Brotherhood. They have a plan for the West.

7 thoughts on “Philadelphia aka ‘Muslim Town’: A look inside

  1. Philadelphians should be soooo proud of their muzzlum heritage and history! After all, it all dates back to 1954 and the one and only Malcolm X who, BTW just so happened to have been SLAUGHTERED IN COLD BLOOD by his “immortal” fearless mentor and leader, the one and only Elijah Mohammed “the great”! BTW, how long ago did,old DEAD E.M. declare upon a stack of korans that he was “NEVA GONNA DIE” but, if and when he did, he was gonna RISE FROM THE DEAD ‘, JUS’ LIKE JESUS’????? Hmmmm….

  2. Philadelphia the new Islamic paradise! Or how Philly became a black hell. I bet Smokey Joes doesn’t exist any more.

  3. Pingback: California: Muslim shoplifter gets $85,000 after hijab removed for mugshot |

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