Scotland: Public school forces students to recite Islamic prayers, perform ritual washing on mosque trip (video)

Creeping in every nation, via Shoebat.com

Are Muslim immigrants forced to visit churches and learn about non-Muslim religious practices?

 

 

 

Middle Eastern Christian Refugees in Europe Bullied, Threatened by Muslim Refugees

The same Syrian Muslims whom Obama is importing to transform towns and cities across America.

via The PJ Tatler Middle Eastern Christian Refugees in Europe Are Bullied, Threatened by Muslim Refugees | PJ Tatler.

A Pakistani Christian, who has fled to the Netherlands, has made a video of life in a refugee center and uploaded it to YouTube. The video has received national attention in the Netherlands because the refugee says he’s regularly bullied and threatened by other refugees, most of whom are Muslim.

He explains:

I am a refugee and live in the refugee center at Gilze en Rijen. There are a lot of Syrian Muslims here who fled the war in their own country. These Muslims have made life impossible for us [red.: for Christian refugees]. I fled from my own country because I thought I’d be safe and welcome here. But I still have to hide here. I contacted the government agency that deals with refugees, but they refuse to intervene. I’ve arrived at a point at which I don’t know what to do.

ChristianUnion MP Joël Voordewind commented after watching the video that this isn’t the first time Christian refugees have complained about Muslim refugees. It happens very often, he says, that radical Muslims take over refugee centers and bully all those who hold different religious beliefs. At the same time, however, they appeal to the Dutch government to get residence permits, saying they aren’t safe in their own countries because of… wait for it: radical Islamic violence.

Although part of the video is in Dutch, the individual fragments are not. The video starts with a short introduction, after which refugee N. Bashir shares scenes he secretly shot when people didn’t know he was filming. In one such scene, the Islamic call for prayer is heard, after which Muslim refugees take over the kitchen to pray. Non-Muslims aren’t allowed to enter the kitchen during prayer times; they have to wait until the Muslims are done with their ritual prayer.

In another scene, one of Bashir’s roommates is seen praying. The man is Muslim, while Bashir and the other roommate are Christian. When Bashir prays (which he does five times a day), the Muslim roommate forces the others to be quiet. If they make a sound, he gets angry with them and starts shouting. As a result, the two Christians don’t dare say or do anything until the other “refugee” is done.

The roommate also tries to irritate and even convert his roommates. He does so by, among other things, playing the Muslim call to prayer loudly on his phone. When his Christian roommates object, he again gets angry and starts shouting.

Lastly, Mr. Bashir recorded a phone call with the authorities about this matter. Like him and his roommate, they are too afraid to intervene, fearing it’ll make the radical Muslim refugees go wild. In the end, a “solution” is offered: the two Christians are allowed to move into another room. Obviously, Mr. Bashir rejects that offer because it means that he, once again, has to take a step back in order to placate fundamentalist Muslims; that’s exactly why he left Pakistan in the first place.

The video and appeal for help have caused a firestorm in the Netherlands, where increasingly more people are worried about the effects of mass-immigration from Muslim countries. Many of these immigrants call themselves refugees, but refuse to assimilate. They’re also, more often than not, fundamentalists themselves who have zero tolerance for people of other faiths.

Czech Republic: 20 Muslim immigrants attack anti-immigration petitioners

Sent in from a reader:

ivcrn

Sorry for my English, hope it will be understandable.

Around 20 foreign students of Arab origin in Czech Republic in city of Olomouc attacked Anti Islam petition stall screaming “In 15 years you will be our slaves” and “Czechs don’t have a right to refuse immigrants”.

Attack stopped after arrival of police. Petition to stop immigrant quotas to resettle immigrants in European Union is organized by non-governmental organisation “Islám v České republice nechceme” or “We do not want Islam in Czech republic”.

http://www.blesk.cz/clanek/zpravy-udalosti/321955/do-15-let-budete-nasi-otroci-kriceli-v-olomouci-arabove-kteri-napadli-stanek-s-petici.html

http://www.novinky.cz/krimi/370915-zahranicni-studenti-v-olomouci-zautocili-na-aktivisty-s-petici-proti-imigrantum.html

 

The Greek Genocide – 100 Years of Silence (Ottoman Jihad)

via 100 Years of Silence. h/t Euro News

By Thea Halo

In the struggle between denial and silence, silence wins hands down. That is, silence wins out over denial if the genocide of a people is to be complete. For almost 100 years, Pontic Greeks have mourned the loss of the 353,000 fathers, mothers, grandparents, children, friends and community members who were slaughtered outright, or who died agonizing deaths on long death marches to expulsion from 1916 to 1923. My mother was among them. Of the 2.6 million Greeks of Ottoman Turkey in 1914, over 700,000 additional Thracian and Anatolian Greeks were slaughtered, bringing the total Greek deaths to over one million.

Although the Pontic Greeks had settled on the southern shores and in the mountains along the Black Sea since 875 B.C., and other Greeks had settled in Anatolia since 1200 B.C., over 2,000 years before the first Turkish tribes invaded, today it’s difficult to find anyone who has heard of the Pontians or Anatolian Greeks, as if they never existed? Ditto for the Assyrians who had settlements in Asia minor dating back four thousand years before the genocide that took the lives of at least 275,000 Assyrians, more than half their population. As with the Pontic Greeks, until recently, it was rare to find anyone who knew Assyrians still existed in the modern world.

Armenian scholars rightfully criticize the Turkish government for the denial of the Armenian Genocide that took place 100 years ago. However, it’s rarely mentioned that the first target of what, for many, has become know exclusively as The Armenian Genocide, began against the Greeks under Ottoman rule in Thrace in the spring of 1913, before the commencement of WWI, and then in the summer of 1914 against the Anatolian Greeks who lived along the western coast of Turkey. Boycotts against Greek shops and goods, massacres of Greeks in towns and villages -instigated by Young Turk propaganda – and conscription of Greek men into the dreaded labor battalions, where they were worked and starved to death, was responsible for hundreds of thousands of Greek deaths.

How did the Young Turks incite hatred against former neighbors? US Consul General George Horton, who was stationed at Smyrna from 1911 to 1917 and again from May 1919 to September 1922, reported that in the spring of 1914, the Aegean Coast Greeks were demonized to induce the Turkish population to destroy them. Horton wrote:

[V]iolent and inflammatory articles in the Turkish newspapers appeared unexpectedly and without any cause … so evidently “inspired” by the authorities … Cheap lithographs … executed in the clumsiest and most primitive manner … represented Greeks cutting up Turkish babies or ripping open pregnant Moslem women, and various purely imaginary scenes, founded on no actual events or even accusations elsewhere made. These were hung in the mosques and schools. … and set the Turk to killing….”

The sequence of events is noteworthy. U.S. Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, Henry Morgenthau Sr., reported at the time that the Young Turks were so successful against the Greeks, that they decided to go after the other “races” as well… the Assyrians and Armenians. Just as Kristallnacht in Nazi Germany signaled the beginning of a full-blown genocide of the Jews, the pogroms against the Thracian and Anatolian Greeks signaled the beginning of a full-blown genocide of the Christians under Ottoman rule, Greeks, Assyrians, and Armenians.

In October 1914, the Assyrians were the next Christian people to be targeted through displacement, without care for their survival. In 1915, both Armenians and Assyrians were subjected to massacres and death marches to expulsion. In 1916, the Pontic Greeks along the Black Sea coast were targeted. Some Pontians were locked in churches and burned alive.

In June 1918, four months before the end of the Great War, the Chicago Daily Tribune reported that at least 1,000,000 Greek men, women, and children had perished as a result of organized massacres and deportations by “the Turco-Teutons” in Asiatic Turkey. On October 30, 1918, the Armistice of Mudros was signed, officially bringing Ottoman participation in the war to an end, but the massacres, death marches, and labor camp conscriptions continued. A New York Times Article dated December 8, 1918, affirms that:

“(…) the Turkish authorities, despite Turkey’s defeat, are pursuing a brutal attitude towards the Christian populations of the empire and are inciting the Ottoman people to fanatical outrages against the non-Moslems. (…) Many signs of organizing among the Turks for new massacres of Christians, and particularly Greeks, are noted.”

While it’s true that denial of this crime is unconscionable, denial has at least kept the memory of the Armenians in the minds, and hopefully the hearts, of the general public. However, where news and diplomatic reports were numerous at the time, today there is usually silence. Silence surrounding the Christian Genocide by the Ottoman and Kemalist regimes between 1913 and 1923 have, until now, rendered the genocide of the Greeks and Assyrians complete. In fact, for the general public, silence over the last 100 years has effectively erased all memory of Pontic Greeks and Assyrians, co-victims of the Armenians, as if they never existed.

Consul General of Greece, George Iliopoulos said at this year’s May 19th Pontian Commemoration Ceremony at Bowling Green in NYC, “an atrocity can be forgiven, but should not be forgotten. Remorse is painful and demonstrates spiritual superiority. Forgetting… shows an inability to comprehend and accept history’s lessons and demonstrates disrespect for the victims. It is also a form of complicity. We need not allow the world or Turkey to forget.”

Senator Leonidas Raptakis joined with other Rhode Island senators to declare May 19th a day of solemn remembrance of the Pontian Genocide, and reminded the gathering at Bowling Green, that “it is vital and proper to those who lost their lives in the Pontian Genocide, and it is paramount that people of all nations look at this horrific event in our world’s not-so-distant history as a way to learn a valuable lesson, so that such atrocities are not tolerated and are never committed again.”

We could start with a U.S. Resolution that recognizes the genocide, not only of the Armenians, but of the 3 million Christians under Ottoman and Kemalist rule, Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks who were slaughtered by various means between 1913 and 1923, which brought four millennia of Christian presence in Turkey to a cruel and bitter end in a matter of 10 short years.

For a personal account of the genocide of all three Christian peoples, see Not Even My Name.

 

Macedonia: Death toll rises after clashes – another Muslim uprising?

You’ll never know reading news reports. via Report: Death toll rises after 2nd day of Macedonia clashes | The Wire

KUMANOVO, Macedonia (AP) — Fighting between police forces and members of an armed group has continued for a second day in the northern Macedonian town of Kumanovo, raising concern about the political stability in the Balkan nation that has a history of ethnic hostilities.

Local TV channel Telma on Sunday reported that three other police officers died early Sunday due to severe injuries sustained in the fighting, increasing the death toll of officers to eight. At least another 30 were injured in an exchange of fire between special police forces and an armed group that started in the town on Saturday.

Early Sunday, ambulances in Kumanovo were seen carrying wounded policemen and sporadic gunfire was heard.

The Macedonian government has declared two days of mourning for those killed in the clashes. Sport events and political gatherings have been canceled.

The “terrorist group,” which had entered Macedonia from an unspecified neighboring country, planned to “use the current political situation to perform attacks on state institutions,” Interior Minister Gordana Jankulovska told reporters late Saturday. She didn’t provide any more details about the organization and the aim of the group also remains unclear.

Jankulovska said that over 20 members of the armed group had surrendered and are being question by police, but that others refused to give up arms and were holed up in houses in Diva Naselba, a neighborhood in western Kumanovo. She refused to say how many members of the group were still at large.

Macedonian President Gjorge Ivanov has called for a National Security Council meeting later Sunday in relation to the latest developments.

EU Enlargement Commissioner Johannes Hahn expressed “deep concern” at the situation unfolding in the Kumanovo region.

“I urge all actors for utmost restraint. Any further escalation must be avoided, not the least in the interest of the overall stability in the country”, Hahn said in a statement.

The clashes come as Macedonia is grappling with its deepest political crisis since its independence from former Yugoslavia in 1991. The government and the opposition have accused each other of planning to destabilize the country to take or preserve power, and some analysts fear leaders on both sides are ready to provoke ethnic clashes as leverage.

Kumanovo is an ethnically mixed town located about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of the capital Skopje, near the border with Kosovo and Serbia. The region was the center of hostilities between ethnic Albanian rebels and government forces during the ethnic conflict in 2001.

That insurgency, in which about 80 people were killed, ended after six months with a Western-brokered peace deal that granted more rights to ethnic Albanians, who make up about a quarter of the country’s 2 million people.

About two weeks ago, authorities said a group of about 40 people wearing uniforms of the disbanded ethnic Albanian Kosovo Liberation Army, or UCK, attacked a police watchtower in Gosince on Macedonia’s northern border with Kosovo and briefly captured four Macedonian police officers.

Authorities described that incident as “very serious” and said Macedonia was the “target of a terrorist attack.”

The UCK, an ethnic Albanian rebel group, fought Serb government forces for Kosovo independence in 1998-1999. International peacekeepers still have a presence in Kosovo.

CNN reports: Gun battles in former ethnic flashpoint in Macedonia kill 5 police officers

Gun battles in a Balkan city with a history of ethnic tensions took the lives of five police officers, Macedonian authorities said.

At least 30 other officers were wounded in the clashes that erupted during a police raid early Saturday on a group of roughly 70 “terrorists” in the town of Kumanovo, Macedonia, the country’s internal affairs ministry said.

Kumanovo is home to minority ethnic Albanians, who are mostly Muslim. Macedonia is majority Orthodox Christian.

More: Sniper fire, explosions: 8 Macedonian police dead after clashes in Albanian district

At least eight police officers and 14 “terrorists” from Kosovo have been killed in clashes in the Albanian-majority area of a northern Macedonian town. Gunfire and explosions lasted for over 24 hours.

Thirty-seven officers were wounded in an operation launched in the town of Kumanovo, Interior Ministry spokesman Ivo Kotevski said, adding that there haven’t been any civilian casualties. The suburb in Kumanovo remains locked down by special police units.

Local Albanian media reported that about 30 of the militants surrendered, while another 15 gunmen were reportedly able to escape.

Police revealed that the armed group illegally entered Macedonia from a neighboring state, without providing any more details. Local media suggest that the group came from Kosovo, which is populated mostly by ethnic Albanians.

Kotevski said earlier that someone in the local population was providing shelter to the armed group.

The most recent incident happened less than three weeks ago when around 40 ethnic Albanians from Kosovo took control of the Macedonian police station on the northern border for a short period of time. They called for the creation of an Albanian state in Macedonia.

https://youtu.be/sioN-5eC0F4

The U.S. supported the KLA:

Gen. Wesley Clark with Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA or UCK) bin Laden-funded terrorist leader [Clark, Jackson, Bernard Kouchner, Agim Ceku, Hashim Taci]

Gen. Wesley Clark with Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA or UCK) bin Laden-funded terrorist leaders [Clark, Jackson, Bernard Kouchner, Agim Ceku, Hashim Taci]

Previously reported, almost three years ago to the day: Jihad creeps in Macedonia, Christians killed

While Remembering the Armenian Genocide, Let’s Not Forget the Greeks and Assyrians

via While Remembering and Commemorating the Armenian Genocide, Let’s Not Forget the Greeks and Assyrians

Armenians and others around the world this month are marking the centennial of the genocide that left hundreds of thousands of Armenians dead early in the last century. The date April 24 is typically picked as the centennial day since it was on that day in 1915 that Turkish authorities rounded up Armenian intellectuals and leaders in Constantinople and murdered them.

It was the first step in a much broader slaughter. The Armenian centennial is getting the attention it deserves from sources as diverse as Pope Francis and Kim Kardashian. The Pope courageously used the word “genocide” in a mass this past weekend, and the Lord’s Prayer was sung in Armenian at the Vatican. Kim Kardashian, whose grandfather was an Armenian immigrant, traveled to the Republic of Armenia with her husband Kayne West, who put on an impromptu concert.

These events are good and an important

What few people know is that the Armenian Genocide was a horrible event that occurred within the context of a wider religious cleansing across Asia Minor that lasted ten years and included Armenians, Greeks and Assyrians. They were all Christians, and they were subjects of the Ottoman Empire.

The religious cleansing was actually the first in modern times, and it fit the pattern of genocides that would follow in the terrible century ahead. It’s worth noting that the Nazis in following decades were transfixed by the events that had occurred in Turkey in those nightmarish years of mass killings and deadly deportations.

The Armenians in many way bore the worst of the slaughter, but ethnic Greeks and Assyrians also were slaughtered in similar ways — and for the same reason: They were scapegoats in a crumbling empire that saw Christians as a dangerous and potentially treasonous population inside the country. There was a strong nationalistic impulse to create a “Turkey for the Turks,” and that meant a homogeneous population based on Turkishness and the Moslem faith.

Christians had long been second-class citizens in the Ottoman Empire, long before the genocide, and they had been subject to pogrom-like actions. But the systematic uprooting of Christians began about 1912 following the First Balkan War, in which Greece, Serbia and Bulgaria defeated the Ottomans and the city of Salonika passed to the Greeks.

It was the nation of Greece that had been part of the alliance that defeated the Ottomans, but it was ethnic Greek subjects of the Ottoman Empire who paid a price in harassment, killing and forced departures. Tens of thousands of ethnic Greeks were forced from their homes along the west (Aegean) coast of Turkey and many were killed.

This had the silent encouragement of Turkey’s military ally, Germany. Virulent propaganda spread images of Christians threatening Islam; hatred was fomented between the faiths.One of the witnesses to the killing was the American consul general in Smyrna, George Horton. Smyrna was a prosperous city on the Aegean, and Horton had been posted there to look after American interests. He documented the killing and reported it back to the State Department. Smyrna itself, after WWI, would itself be destroyed in the religious hatred directed toward Christians.

The Armenian genocide is typically bracketed by 1915-1916, during World War I. And for sure, this is when most of the killing took place. Armenian civilians were marched out of their towns and cities and segregated by sex and age. Men were killed immediately; women and children were marched long distances until they dropped form disease, thirst or starvation. The first-hand accounts of these treks are numerous and collected in letters, cables and reports in libraries though the world.

After WWI, the British made an attempt to bring the Ottoman mass killers to justice, but the effort faltered as Britain’s grasp on the situation inside Turkey faltered. A nationalist movement arose, and the forces of religious hatred were again unleashed. The killing of Christians was renewed with Ottoman Greeks as well as Armenians being shot and marched to their deaths. American and British consuls diplomats in the region provided a first-hand account of the killing.

The situation was worsened when the Allied Powers and the United States invited the nation of Greece to occupy Smyrna, a mostly Greek city inside Turkey, to forestall a landing by the Italians who wanted to seize the city as the spoils of war. The powers sent Greece to Smyrna, but when war broke out between the army of Greece and the Nationalist army of Turkey, they did next to nothing to support it.

As a consequence, more Christians — people who were Ottoman subjects — were murdered in towns and cities from the Black Sea to the south coast of Turkey. By the end of 1922, about three millions Christians had been killed in the decade-long religious cleansing that operated essentially under two Turkish governments.

The final catastrophe was the Turkish army’s occupation of Smyrna, a prosperous and cosmopolitan city of a half million people. The city was burned, and countless numbers of civilians slaughtered on the city’s streets and in their homes. The occupation of Smyrna was, in an important sense, the last episode of the genocide. It was also a marker of the end of the Ottoman Empire. After Smyrna, a new order arose, led by Turkey’s brilliant, ruthless and secular leader Mustafa Kemal, later called Ataturk.

So, as we commemorate the Armenian genocide, and give it the historical standing and label it deserves, let us not forget that many hundreds of thousands of others perished in the 20th Century’s first genocide.

Editor’s note: Lou Ureneck is a professor at Boston University and author of the forthcoming book, “The Great Fire: One American’s Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century’s First Genocide.” It can now be pre-ordered here.


Related: Video: The Truth About the Armenian Genocide by Turkish Muslims

The Forgotten Genocide – 100 Years Ago

via The forgotten genocide

For most people April 24th is just another day, not very different from any other, but for various Armenian communities around the world, including the large community of Armenians living in the greater Los Angeles area, it is a day of remembrance of their 1.5 million countrymen who were victims of brutal mass murders during World War I. Armenia is a nation that has had its hills painted with the blood of its people for thousands of years. Yet, though its song and dance have helped it overcome its horrific past, the Armenian Genocide perpetrated by the Turkish Ottoman Empire is a page of its past that just simply cannot be turned with ease.

First, the Ottoman government demanded the peaceful resignation of weapons from the Armenians, including all types of knives. Armenian notables were called to a meeting at which they were arrested. The mass arrest of Armenian political leaders is carried out. Armenian intellectuals and community leaders are arrested in Constantinople, sent to nearby cities and later slain. Deportations slowly began and soon there were multiple reports of starvation and spread of disease. Shortly after the Ottoman empire proclaimed jihad against England, France and Russia, unfounded accusations were made against Armenians that they were planning to join the Russian forces. From the Central Prison of city of Sivas where many Armenian intellectuals, political leaders, and the leading men of the villages surrounding Sivas were imprisoned, 15,000 Armenians were taken out and slain in the 36 extermination centers of the region.

Some of the inhabitants were sent to the Konia Desert in central Anatolia. The rest were sent to Der-el-Zor (Deir el-Zor) in the Syrian Desert. To further cut off the flow of information Azadamart, the leading Armenian newspaper in Constantinople, was closed by an order the government issued through the office of the police commissioner of Constantinople. Mass executions of Armenian soldiers in the Turkish army took place in various public squares for the purpose of terrorizing the Armenians, while with voluntary contributions, Armenians were building several hospitals for the use of the Turkish army through the Red Crescent Society.

The Armenians working in labor corps in Sivas were instructed to convert to Islam. At least 95% refused and were murdered. In order to further the Islamization and Turkification of the Armenian remnants in the Hawran District, all the Armenian clerics found there were murdered by the Turks.

On September 14, 1915 The New York Times reported that there were already at least 350,000 Armenians who were murdered. By August 19th of that same year British Ambassador to the United States, Lord Bryce, reported the number murdered to be 500,000. Shortly after, interim ChargÈ d’affaires for Germany, Wilhelm Radowitz, reported to the German Chancellor, Theobald von Bethman Hollweg that of the 2,000,000 Armenians in Turkey, 1.5 million had been deported. Of these 1,175,000 were dead; 325,000 were still living.

Toward the end of WWI the Ottoman leaders were held responsible for the atrocities, court martialed and sentenced to death, but not before leaving an indelible mark of blood and gory resulting in the death of up to an estimated 1.5 million people. The irony of it all is that today the Armenian genocide is still not recognized by Turkey and not formally recognized by most nations who have more interest vested in political gains than humanity and justice.

Many today would deny that the Armenian Genocide ever took place, attributing the massive loss of life to wartime casualties that inflicted all nations during the time. But various reports from foreigners in the area at the time paint a different picture that verify the intentional atrocities.

Please visit www.genocide1915.info for more information about the Armenian Genocide including a detailed timeline.


Remember, Obama Preventing Smithsonian from Displaying Genocide-era Armenian Artwork.

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