How Muslim Brotherhood Operates in Tennessee (Part 8 of 8)

via Tennessee Council 4 political justice.

After the Holy Land Foundation prosecution, the FBI severed its relationship with CAIR because of its associations with the HAMAS-support network. But some FBI field offices violated the restrictions.

In 2011, a continuing funding resolution signed by Obama included language that barred the FBI from partnering with unindicted co-conspirators like CAIR. Two years later, the DOJ Inspector General released a report documenting how the FBI violated the Congressional ban by working with CAIR.

Regardless of the FBI’s efforts, CAIR directors work to undermine law enforcement. Michigan’s Dawud Walid tells his listeners not to cooperate with the FBI because they are “agent provocateurs” that target Muslims.” Walid was brought to Tennessee by ACO’s director to train Muslim high school students in political activism.

CAIR spreads suspicion about the FBI and posted this flyer on their website:

On a broader scale, the Islamist organizations are working to sanitize law enforcement training materials by withholding pertinent information and thus, effectively neutering our national security agencies.

In 2013 Judicial Watch issued its detailed report about the purge of counterterrorism training materials used by different federal agencies. The identities of who decided which materials were offensive and needed to be removed, is unknown; 876 pages and 392 presentations were purged.

Kenneth Moore, the Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Knoxville Office, signed the FBI memo detailing the information purged from the FBI training programs. Moore spoke at the Tennessee AMAC (American Muslim Advisory Council) event jn Manchester where Tennesseans were told what they could and could not say about Islam and Muslims.

In August 2014, Tennessee’s Muslim ACO (American Center for Outreach) along with CAIR and other Muslim Brotherhood affiliate organizations, signed onto another letter demanding more purging of materials and retraining of personnel across government agencies.

Tennessee’s lead law enforcers work to appease Islamists

In 2009 James Cotter a TNDHS Regional Advisor said with regard to foreign threats, “anything that they do over there can happen here and will.”

Two short years later, Tennessee’s Islamists received a congratulatory letter from Bill Gibbons, TN Commissioner of Safety and Homeland Security, Cotter was promoted for helping AMAC to organize and AMAC members were included in department trainings. So, there is no reason to believe that Tennessee’s law enforcement personnel are receiving complete and fact based training about Islamist activity in the state.

The Muslim Brotherhood Plan specifically addressed subversion of the media. Tennessee’s Islamists are working aggressively to subvert any media effort to objectively and truthfully report about the Islamist agenda in our state. ACO’s director Paul “Iesa Galloway’s background is in PR & media. AMAC board member Sabina Mohyuddin supports Muslim Brotherhood organizations. They recently brought the Muslim Brotherhood’s media influence operation to the desk of The Tennessean editorial board.


 

Read it all & the prior seven parts.

Seattle Muslim charged with terrorism after jihad attacks kill 4 Americans

This Muslim jihadist confessed almost a year ago. The media ignored the story – the only time they seem to ignore the killing of gays and blacks is when the killer is Muslim. via Seattle man charged with murder, terrorism in New Jersey | KOMO News. h/t Ninja

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) – A Seattle man was indicted on murder and terrorism charges Thursday for allegedly shooting a New Jersey college student last year in a fit of rage over the U.S. government’s role in the Middle East, which authorities said is the first time a terror charge has been brought in the state in connection with a murder case.

Ali Muhammad Brown, 30, fatally shot Brendan Tevlin while the 19-year-old was stopped at a traffic light in northern New Jersey, authorities said.

Brown also faces three aggravated murder charges in Seattle, where authorities said last year the killings were part of a crusade to punish the U.S. government for its foreign policies.

Authorities said in court documents filed in Seattle last year that Brown described himself to detectives after his New Jersey arrest as a strict Muslim who was angry with the U.S. government’s role in Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan because of the death of innocent civilians and children.

“The defendant was on a bloody crusade, executing four innocent men … with the same murder weapon, over the course of approximately two months, and all under the common and single scheme of exacting ‘vengeance’ against the United States government for its foreign policies,” prosecutors said.

Tevlin was shot multiple times on June 25, 2014 as he stopped at a traffic light in West Orange on his way home to Livingston, roughly five or 10 minutes away. Tevlin was home after completing his freshman year at the University of Richmond. At the time, Brown had been a fugitive for three weeks after authorities in Seattle identified him as a suspect in the slayings of two men early on the morning of June 1.

Brown was arrested in woods not far from the site of Tevlin’s killing, in an area that includes a golf course and the South Mountain Reservation, a 2,000-acre park in the center of Essex County.

At the time of Brown’s arrest, Murray said results of ballistics tests from the Tevlin shooting were put into a national database and matched with the gun that was used in the Seattle murders. Authorities said they picked up Brown’s trail after an alleged robbery and attempted carjacking in Point Pleasant on June 29, four days after Tevlin was killed.

The prosecutor’s office announced Thursday it had dropped charges in the Tevlin slaying against West Orange residents Eric Williams and Jeremy Villagran, who were charged along with Brown.

In the New Jersey case Brown is also charged with felony murder, carjacking, robbery and multiple weapons offenses.


 

 Previous posts on Ali Muhammad here.

New Jersey: Another Muslim arrested on terror charges

The fifth tri-state area Muslim arrested this month on jihad charges. alaa_saadeh_0629b alaa_saadeh_0629

via Fifth arrest made in New Jersey for terror-related charges | New York’s PIX11 / WPIX-TV.

NEWARK, N.J. — A New Jersey man has been arrested on suspicion of conspiring to provide material support to terrorists, the fifth such arrest of a tri-state area resident this month, the FBI said Monday.

Alaa Saadeh, 23, of West New York, N.J., was taken into custody Monday morning at his home, the FBI said.

In addition to accusations he conspired with other men in New Jersey and New York to provide services and personnel to the Islamic State terror group, Saadeh is suspected of trying to persuade a witness to lie to the FBI, the agency said.

The 23-year-old appeared before a judge Monday afternoon.

Manny Gomez, a former FBI agent and founder of MG Security Services says that Monday’s arrest should be embraced with mixed feelings, “The authorities are doing an amazing job at identifying, investigating and ultimately arresting these people and stopping these attacks.”

That is the good news.

As for the bad?

“The bad news is that statistically speaking, ISIS is recruiting more and more young people on a daily basis and the authorities are being challenged more and more everyday to keep up with these potential attacks,” says Gomez.

The FBI said Saadeh’s brother left the U.S. in May allegedly to join the terror group, which uses beheadings and mass killings — often captured on camera then published online — to impose its violent agenda.

Saadeh along with another man and Samuel Rahamin Topaz, 21, of Fort Lee, allegedly traveled with him and promised to meet overseas again in a few weeks. Soon after, Saadeh’s brother, whom the FBI did not identify, was arrested in Jordan on suspicion of supporting ISIS, federal officials said.

But Saadeh, Topaz and a third man continued to discuss their suspected terror goals. That is, until May 21 when he and Topaz allegedly talked about the need to “lay low,” apparently suspicious that someone may have “snitched” on their plans and that the feds were listening, the FBI said.

Saadeh allegedly revealed to an informant that he supported ISIS and their brutal slayings, the FBI said. He then allegedly told someone in New Jersey to “play dumb” and be “honest up to a point” but be sure not to tell the FBI anything about his suspected terror aspirations.

PIX 11 spoke with U.S. Representative Yvette Clarke, a former Member of the House Committee on Homeland Security at her Brooklyn office. Rep. Clarke says it translates to, “Well it just says to me that we’ve got a lot more work to do in terms of finding those potential lone operators.”

Rep. Clarke also added that equally as disturbing is the fact that a number of the men arrested are relatively young, “It speaks to some sort of disillusionment among some young people, particularly those who would be more vulnerable to those trying to find acceptance and unfortunately that acceptance is through theses dramatic terrorist plots.”

As for the fact that this is the fifth arrest in the tri-State area in recent weeks, Gomez says the rash is concerning, “Five in a short amount of time in the same area is a new thing and it makes one wonder how many more are out there in the country that we don’t have eyes and ears on that can potentially blow up, literally at any given time.”

Each count in the complaint against Saadeh carries a maximum potential penalty of 20 years in prison and a fine of $250,000.


Another news source writes:

Saadeh could face up to 60 years in prison if convicted.

According to the federal complaint, Saadeh believed one of the others snitched on him when he learned his brother was arrested overseas. Saadeh allegedly said he would “kill someone” and told a witness to “play dumb” after he learned the FBI was on to him.


Another article writes: A Roommate Told the FBI About His Suspicions of Saadeh & His Brother.

DOJ press release here.

Criminal complaint here.

Oregon: Muslim Gets 87 Months for Funding Suicide Bomber Who Killed 30

via FBI — Oregon Resident Sentenced to 87 Months in Prison in Connection with 2009 Suicide Bombing of ISI Headquarters in Pakistan.

Reaz Qadir Khan, 51, a naturalized U.S. Citizen living in Portland, Oregon, was sentenced today to 87 months in prison by U.S. District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman of the District of Oregon in connection with the May 27, 2009, suicide bomb attack at Pakistan’s intelligence service (ISI) headquarters in Lahore, Pakistan. The attack killed approximately 30 people and injured some 300 more.

Assistant Attorney General for National Security John P. Carlin, Acting U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams of the District of Oregon and Special Agent in Charge Greg Bretzing of the FBI’s Portland Division made the announcement.

Khan previously entered a guilty plea admitting that he acted as an accessory after the fact to the crime of providing material support to terrorists. In entering his plea, Khan admitted arranging for the delivery of approximately $2,450 to Maldivian Ali Jaleel, one of the suicide bombers responsible for the May 27, 2009, attack. Khan also admitted to providing advice and financial assistance to Jaleel’s wives after the bombing, while knowing that providing such assistance would hinder and prevent the apprehension of Jaleel’s wives and others who may have helped in the attack. The 87-month sentence was jointly recommended by the parties and concludes a lengthy investigation of Khan’s connection to the attack.


Deport him.

 

Number of Islamic Terror-Related Arrests in 2015 Surpass Previous Two Years Combined

via Number of Islamic Terror-Related Arrests in 2015 Surpass Previous Two Years Combined | PJ Tatler.

by Patrick Poole

Last month I reported here exclusively at PJ Media on the rapidly escalating number of Islamic terror-related arrests this year, noting that we were on pace to surpass the number of arrests for 2013 and 2014 combined (48) before the halfway point of the current year next week.

In fact, that is exactly what has happened. At present 53 suspects have been arrested or involved in Islamic terror-related incidents with law enforcement since the beginning of the year.

This is top among reasons why Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), chairman of the House Intelligence Committee said just a few days ago that this is “the highest threat level we have ever faced in this country”.

Here are the additional cases since I reported last month, beginning with the most recent:

June 22: Justin Nojan Sullivan, 19, of Morganton, North Carolina, was charged with attempting to materially support ISIS and two related weapons possession charges. According to local press reports, the teen intended to attack a bar or concert, and then kill as many as 1,000 victims. DOJ press release. Complaint.

June 19: Amir Said Abdul Rahman Al-Ghazi aka Robert C. McCollum, 38, of North Olmstead, Ohio, was arrested for attempting to provide material support to ISIS, illegal possession of a firearm by a felon, and trafficking marijuana. Media reports indicate that Al-Ghazi had been known to the FBI since December 2012 due to his social media activity, and that in June 2014 he pledged allegiance to ISIS in a Facebook posting.  FBI press release. Complaint.

June 17: Samuel Rahamin Topaz, 21, of Fort Lee, New Jersey, was arrested and charged with conspiring with others to provide services and personnel to ISIS. DOJ press release. Complaint.

June 17: Fareed Mumuni, 21, of Staten Island, New York, an associate of Topaz, was arrested for attempting to repeatedly stab an FBI agent investigating his role in a possible domestic terror plot. In court documents, prosecutors said that “Mumuni espouses violent jihadist beliefs and is a fervent supporter of (ISIS).” Complaint.

June 13: Munther Omar Saleh, 20, of Queens, New York, an associate of both Topaz and Mumuni, was arrested for plotting to set off a pressure cooker bomb at a New York City landmark in support of ISIS. He was arrested when they lunged at a law enforcement surveillance vehicle that had been following his movements. According to the complaint, Saleh was active on social media, saying in September 2014 that Al-Qaeda was becoming too moderate, and expressing his praise for the Charlie Hebdo attack in January and the attempted attack in Garland, Texas last month. Complaint.

June 11: Akmal Zakirov, 29, an Uzbek national, was charged as the fifth member of a Brooklyn-based cell to materially support ISIS. Specifically, Zakirov had assisted in helping others plan to travel to Syria to join ISIS. DOJ press release. Indictment.

June 11: Nicholas Rovinski aka Nuh Amriki, 24, of Warwick, Rhode Island, was arrested for conspiracy to obstruct an investigation and conspiracy to materially support ISIS related to his role in an ISIS-inspired domestic terror plot with two Boston-based associates. FBI press release. Complaint.

June 10: Abdul Malik Abdul Kareem aka Decarus Thomas, of Phoenix, Arizona, was indicted by a federal grand jury for his role in the attempted Garland, Texas terror attack by his associates, Elton Simpson and Nadir Soofi, in early May. According to the indictment, Kareem had taken the pair shooting, had supplied weapons to Simpson and Soofi, and hosted a gathering in his home to discuss the Garland “Draw Muhammad” event. He is accused of later lying to FBI agents after Simpson and Soofi were killed during the attempted attack. In a subsequent hearing in the case, the FBI said that Kareem had discussed attacking the Super Bowl. Indictment.

June 10: Reza Niknejad, 18, of Prince William County, Virginia, was charged with conspiring to provide material support to terrorists, conspiring to provide material support to ISIS and conspiring to kill and injure people abroad. He was charged in abstentia since he traveled to Syria in January to join ISIS. The charges were announced in conjunction with the plea agreement reached with one of his conspirators, 17-year-old Ali Shukri Amin. DOJ press release.

June 2: Usaamah Abdullah Rahim, 26, of Roslindale, Massachusetts, was killed in a confrontation with FBI agents and a Boston police officer after lunging at them with a large, military-style knife. The FBI wanted to speak to Rahim about his intended plan to kill police officers. One of Rahim’s conspirators, David Wright aka Dawud Sharif Abdul Khaliq, 25, of Everett, Massachusetts, was arrested later that same day and charged with obstructing justice in the investigation. Wright and Nicholas Rovinski were later charged with conspiracy to materially support ISIS. FBI press release. Initial Wright complaint.

May 27: Leon Nathan Davis, 37, of Augusta, Georgia, was charged with trying to aid ISIS. The charges appear related to his October 2014 arrest at Atlanta Hartfield Airport and weapons charges filed in February. FBI press release.

May 26: Asher Abed Khan, 20, of Spring, Texas, was charged with conspiracy to materially support ISIS. As I reported here at PJ Media, Khan planned to travel to Syria through Turkey to join ISIS, but was lured back home by his family who lied and told him that his mother was dying. Khan apparently made it onto the FBI’s radar when his social media messages turned up in another investigation. According to the criminal complaint, one of Khan’s friends was successful in leaving the country and joining ISIS in Syria. FBI press release. Complaint.

It should be noted that every single case I’ve reported on here involves support for ISIS. This is undoubtedly the result of a directive from FBI headquarters for its field offices to “shake every tree” following the attempted terror attack in Garland, Texas in early May, much to the bureau’s credit.

Last week Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX), chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee told CNN that small scale ISIS attacks should be expected on July 4th, amidst an active hunt for ISIS supporters by the FBI ahead of the Independence Day celebrations. But with rising support for ISIS here and abroad, it remains to be seen whether these efforts will be sufficient.

North Carolina: Father Tips Off Police to Muslim-Convert Son’s Jihad Sympathies

via Father Tips Off Police to Son’s Alleged ISIS Sympathies, Authorities Say – ABC News.

A North Carolina man was charged today with planning to gun down “a large number of citizens” in attacks to support ISIS here in the United States, authorities said.

Ironically, it was the suspect’s father who first alerted authorities to his son’s ISIS sympathies. As a result, 19-year-old Justin Sullivan was arrested over Father’s Day weekend.

Sullivan_3

The criminal complaint charges that Justin Sullivan planned to buy a semi-automatic AR-15 rifle at the Hickory, North Carolina gun show, and use it to kill people “at a bar or concert.” Sullivan was arrested at his home in Morganton this past Friday and in a subsequent interview with the FBI, admitted that he looked online for nearby places to attack.

Authorities said Sullivan allegedly had plans for a “mass attack, while the criminal complaint states that authorities believe Justin Sullivan was radicalized by watching ISIS videos on social media.

Sullivan is charged with one count of attempting to provide material support to ISIS, one count of transporting and receiving a silencer in interstate commerce with intent to commit a felony, and one count of receipt and possession of an unregistered silencer, unidentified by a serial number. The charge of conspiracy to provide material support to a designated foreign organization carries a maximum potential penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

The FBI first became aware of Justin Sullivan in April, when his father called 911, saying, “I don’t know if it is ISIS or what, but he (Justin Sullivan) is destroying Buddhas, and figurines and stuff.”

In June, an FBI undercover officer made contact with him, and Sullivan told him he had converted to Islam, and was a “mujahid,” authorities said.

Sullivan told the undercover agent he should get “an AR-15 with split core ammo … it’s fragmenting hollow points … deadly,” authorities said.

He also wanted the undercover to “just kill a few people so that I know you are truthful,” according to authorities.

Federal investigators said that among the people he wanted killed were his own parents. Sullivan also asked the undercover FBI agent to help him make a homemade silencer, and he made grandiose plans for a mass attack.

According to the charging document, Sullivan wrote the undercover officer, “500 is an incorrect body count.” He said 1,000 was correct, “I’m thinking about using biological weapons … coat our bullets with cyanide … and then set off a gas bomb to finish the rest.”

In one of his last conversations with the undercover agent, authorities said Sullivan talked about a second attack, “we could use a U-Haul packed with bombs and then detonate it.”

 

New Jersey: Muslim Arrested in ISIS Support Case, 4th Muslim Arrested in a Week

via Samuel Rahamin Topaz Accused Of Conspiring To Provide Support To ISIS « CBS New York.

jihadi-Topaz

NEWARK, N.J. (CBSNewYork/AP) — A New Jersey man has been charged with conspiring with three other men to provide material support to the Islamic State terror group.

Samuel Rahamin Topaz, of Fort Lee, was arrested Wednesday and is charged with conspiring with others in New Jersey and New York to provide services and personnel to ISIS.

According to prosecutors, the 21-year-old was arrested at his home and made an initial court appearance in front of a federal judge in Newark Thursday. He is being held without bail.

Prosecutors alleged one of Topaz’s co-conspirators was a Munther Omar Saleh, 20, who was arrested in Queens this week. Another alleged co-conspirator traveled oversees to join ISIS in May, prosecutors said.

The third co-conspirator wasn’t identified but was said to be a New Jersey resident.

As CBS2’s Jessica Schneider reported, the suspect shared ominous posts on social media.

Topaz posted selfies on Facebook wearing the head and face coverings similar to those worn by jihadist fighters.

One of his friends alerted the FBI to his troubling behavior.

Topaz lives in a Fort Lee apartment building with his mother and younger brother.

He used to sing and was in a band — and was seen playing guitar in a Facebook video. But in the past few months the feds said he withdrew from his friends and began associating with men that the FBI had been monitoring — including Saleh, 20, the student from Queens arrested Saturday near the Whitestone Bridge.

Saleh is accused of planning an attack on New York City landmarks on behalf of ISIS.

A complaint alleges months of correspondence between Topaz and Saleh, and two other men. One of the men left the U.S. to fly to the Middle East last month.

The men allegedly made plans to join ISIS but ran into financial issues.

“I’m not sure how much longer I can take not being in the Dawla. Honestly, everything is so accesible and unchangeable and excessive in American that I feel any much longer I’m here I might just start fasting to get much closer to God,” Topaz said in a text to Saleh on May 4.

Agents executed a search warrant and arrested Topaz on Wednesday.

Debra Weinberg saw Topaz being led out of his home in hadcuffs.

“I think it can happen here because we’re very close to Manhattan and it makes me nervous, but you have to go on with your life,” she said.

The feds said that after his arrest Topaz admitted to sympathizing with ISIS and planned to travel overseas.

Another man, Fareed Mumuni of Staten Island, was also arrested Wednesday morning after allegedly attacking an FBI agent with the Joint Terrorism Task Force with a knife during a search of his home.

Investigators said Mumuni “repeatedly attempted to plunge the kitchen knife into the torso of an FBI Special Agent,” CBS2’s Jessica Schneider previously reported.

None of the stabs penetrated the agent’s body armor, and he suffered only minor injuries, according to the criminal complaint.

Authorities said Mumuni and Saleh were plotting to explode a pressure cooker bomb in the city, CBS2 reported.

If convicted, Topaz faces a maximum of 15 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.


There are at least two other pre-jihad Muslims that associated with this cell in New Jersey:

The FBI said Topaz also met regularly with two others who have not been charged — dual citizens of the U.S. and Jordan, ages 20 and 23. The younger one left the U.S. on May 5 for Jordan and presumably attempted to travel on to Syria, the FBI said.

Under questioning, Topaz said he sympathized with ISIS and watched videos, and admitted speaking with three others about wanting to join ISIS, the complaint stated.

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 44,569 other followers

%d bloggers like this: