Dearborn: Muslims jailed in $29 million Medicare fraud scheme

An update on this case. via 3 receive prison, restitution in $29 million Medicare fraud scheme – Crain’s Detroit Business. h/t Dee

An adult day care center operator and two former home health care company owners face prison and more than $10 million in restitution payments after a federal judge sentenced them for their roles in a $29 million Medicare fraud scheme.

Felicar Williams, 51, of Dearborn, received five years in prison and more than $2.4 million in court-ordered restitution after a jury conviction for conspiracy to commit health care fraud and conspiracy to receive health care kickbacks. At issue were Medicare billings from Haven Adult Day Care Center LLC, a business that was registered in Madison Heights. Prosecutors contend Williams billed Medicare through the company for psychotherapy services that were not provided.

Meanwhile, Abdul Malik Al-Jumail, 54, owner of ABC Home Care Inc. and other companies, received 10 years in prison and nearly $8.4 million in ordered restitution, and daughter Jamella Al-Jumail, 25, received four years in prison and $589,516 in restitution.

All three were sentenced by U.S. District Judge Denise Page Hood in Detroit following a 12-week jury trial that ended Sept. 30. The three were among more than a dozen co-defendants in a $29 million Medicare fraud prosecution that began in 2012, and several others have previously entered guilty pleas in that case.

In some instances, federal officials contend Williams billed Medicare for services to patients who were already deceased. Williams also sold private medical information of patients to Abdul Malik Al-Jumail, who in turn caused Medicare claims to be submitted for home health care and physical therapy services that were never provided.

Jamella Al-Jumail also allegedly submitted false Medicare billings for home health care and physical therapy. She was also accused of telling an employee the day her father was arrested to retrieve falsified records, which she and others later burned.

The elder Al-Jumail was convicted of health fraud conspiracy and conspiracy to pay and receive health care kickbacks, while Jamella Al-Jumail was convicted of health fraud conspiracy and destroying documents in connection with a federal investigation.


In unrelated Dearborn cases where Muslims robbed taxpayers:

Southeast Michigan physician pleads guilty to $4.2 million Medicare fraud.

Owner of home health agencies in Oakland County pleads guilty to $22M in Medicare fraud

Minneapolis: Airplane-fueling Muslim joins ISIS, promptly meets Allah

h/t Jihad Watch who notes:

No one would have dreamed of trying to determine whether Ahmed should really have been fueling passenger jets. That would have been “Islamophobic.”

via Facing child support, Minneapolis man joins the jihad

MINNEAPOLIS — Abdifatah Ahmed struggled for years to make ends meet.

After losing his $15-an-hour job fueling airliners in Minneapolis, the Somali-American father of nine survived on low-wage jobs and public assistance. He complained about working hard, but never having enough money. His circumstances worsened when he was ordered to pay more than $700 a month to support three of his children — including one less than a year old.

Months later, he surfaced in Syria, where he went to fight for the Islamic State.

“I think since he lost his job, he was maybe never normal after that,” sister Muna Ahmed told the AP last fall.

“It’s unbelievable,” his friend, Farhan Hussein, said recently. “Where did this disease come from?”

Hussein said his friend seemed confused about life, and sometimes felt stressed out by the women with whom he had children: Minnesota court papers show at times he was paying child support to two ex-wives for five of his kids, as well as support for a sixth whose mother is not identified. He wasn’t the type to go to mosque or pray every day — instead, he went clubbing and even drank alcohol, Hussein said.

When he felt troubled, Ahmed might turn to his religion for a week or so at a time. But once the blues passed, he would be back to his old self — flirting with women, dressing sharply, listening to rap music, shooting hoops and lifting weights at a local gym, Hussein said.

He dipped sporadically into political discussions, speaking about the Palestinians, the civil war in Libya and conditions in the Ogaden region of Ethiopia where many Somalis live. But the continued atrocities against Syrian civilians committed by the Assad regime apparently made a deeper impression.

On Dec. 3, 2013, a post on his Facebook account showed pictures of mutilated kids: “Look what is happening in syria. Where is the UN when u need them. This is worse than libya you get it?”

A month later, it appears, Ahmed was in Syria himself.

“A muslim has to stand up for was right. … I give up this worldly life for allah and to save the ummah (community of believers) if that makes terrorist am happy with it,” he wrote in a Jan. 3, 2014 post.

Another post that same day contains a photo of him holding a rifle in one hand, and a book that may be the Quran in the other.

Alarmed, Hussein messaged Ahmed, urging him to come home. After ignoring his friend for months, Ahmed replied that “we’ve got to fight” for the caliphate.

Ahmed’s last Facebook posts, including one that says “having fun in jihad,” are dated last July 25.

The next month, a member of Ahmed’s family received a picture that appeared to show him dead, with a gunshot wound to the head. The State Department is working to verify reports of Ahmed’s death, but Hussein identified the person in the photo as his friend, who would have been 34 according to court records.

 

Minneapolis: Somali Muslim terror suspects used college loans to finance jihad travels

They should have done what Democratic Congressman and Muslim Keith Hakim Ellison did, let the Muslim Brotherhood pay for the trip.

via 2 Twin Cities men in [Islamic] terrorism case now face fraud charges – StarTribune.com.

Hanad Mustafe Musse, 19

Two Twin Cities men charged with conspiracy to fight alongside terrorists now face financial fraud charges for allegedly using their college loans to purchase airline tickets to fly to the Middle East.

In a superseding indictment unsealed Tuesday by the U.S. attorney’s office in Minnesota, Hamza Ahmed and Hanad Mustafe Musse were charged with using more than $1,000 of financial aid provided to them.

Ahmed, 21, from Savage, and Musse, 19, of Minneapolis, are among seven young Somali-Americans from Minnesota who face charges of planning to leave the United States and fight alongside Islamic extremist groups. Six of them were charged in April.

During the last two years, more than 20 Somali-Americans from Minnesota have left to fight alongside terrorists with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL, according to the FBI.

The new indictment says that Ahmed and Musse bought airline tickets on Nov. 8, 2014 from New York’s John F. Kennedy Airport to Europe, using more than $1,000 in federal college financial aid. Hamza used his aid money to purchase a flight to Istanbul, Turkey, authorities say. Musse used similar funds to buy a ticket to travel to Greece. From those two destinations, authorities say the pair then planned on heading to Syria. Hamza had actually boarded his flight when he was ordered off the plane by officers from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

In a related matter, Abdurahman Daud, 20, another alleged conspirator, made his first appearance in federal court in Minneapolis on Tuesday morning before U.S. Chief District Judge Micheal Davis. Daud was arrested by the FBI in San Diego in late April, along with alleged conspirator Mohamed Farah, after they drove from Minneapolis to California. They were accompanied on the trip by a confidential informant who was working for the FBI.

Daud and Farah allegedly planned on acquiring false documents in San Diego in order to cross into Mexico. From there, they planned on flying to the Middle East with the intent of entering Syria to fight, authorities say.

Daud, who is charged with providing material support to terrorists, is scheduled to appear for a detention hearing Friday afternoon in front of Davis. Farah is charged with conspiracy and is expected to be returned to the Twin Cities later this week. Farah’s brother, Adnan, was arrested last month in connection with this case and is charged with providing support to terrorists. He is being held in the Sherburne County jail.

Ayan Farah, their mother, attended Daud’s hearing along with about three dozen men, women and children from the Somali community in the Twin Cities. She said she spoke to Adnan recently and said he appeared to be doing well. “It’s very difficult,” she said.


Three dozen Somali Muslims went to court? Don’t they go to work or school? That means you – the American taxpayer – are subsidizing these terror supporters.

 

Iowa: Gun-smuggling Muslim had ties to Hezbollah; threatened to honor kill daughter

…for marrying a non-Muslim. An update on this post from last week, Iowa: 4 Muslims arrested for smuggling guns to Syria in halal food container.

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via Gun smuggling suspect had ties to Hezbollah, agent says.

The eldest of four Cedar Rapids family members accused of smuggling firearms into Lebanon is a Hezbollah sympathizer who met with reported members of the terrorist group during a trip abroad, federal agents testified Friday.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Richard Murphy called six witnesses to paint Ali Afif Al Herz as loyal to the Lebanese-based Shi’ite militant and political organization. The United States is one of several nations that have classified Hezbollah as a terrorist organization.

Murphy intended the testimony from agents with the Department of Homeland Security and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to persuade Chief Magistrate Judge Jon Scoles to keep Herz, 50, in county jail while awaiting trial on charges that he and three other family members tried to smuggle hundreds of guns and thousands of rounds of ammunition into Lebanon, hiding it in storage containers.

Defense lawyer Anne Laverty quickly accused Murphy of using “distraction and fear tactics” with no supporting evidence that ties Herz to any terrorist group. Herz came to the United States in 1984 for college and gave up on religion after watching decades of strife in Lebanon and the Middle East, she said.

“He has specifically rejected religion,” she said. “He has no ties to religious extremists here or in Lebanon.”

Authorities on Tuesday jailed Herz; his son, Adam Ben Ali Al Herz, 22; his brother, Bassem Afif Herz, 30; and his brother’s wife, Sarah Majid Zeaiter, 24, on charges of attempting to illegally smuggle firearms into Beirut, Lebanon. An investigation led by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security found the four purchased at least 113 rifles and handguns from Iowa gun stores over a 17-month period.

Staying in jail

In a ruling Friday afternoon, Scoles decided to leave Ali Herz behind bars, along with Herz’s son and sister-in-law, who were also charged. All three have lived for significant periods in Lebanon and could have enough money to flee, he said. There’s “strong evidence” against the family members, and a conviction on the charges could result in a five-year prison sentence, Scoles said.

Bassem Herz, 29, waived a detention hearing and will remain in custody. The men are all U.S. citizens, and Zeaiter is a lawful permanent resident, according to criminal complaints.

The magistrate noted that no evidence produced Friday linked the guns to Hezbollah fighters or other terrorist groups.

Scoles said it is just as possible that the guns were being sent for Lebanese citizens seeking to protect themselves in a country increasingly destabilized by the civil war in neighboring Syria and the threat of the Islamic State group.

“It’s possible that they were intended for terrorist organizations for bad purposes,” Scoles said. “I’m not going to speculate … there’s no evidence to any of that.”

Wearing handcuffs and an orange jail uniform, Ali Herz smiled and waved at family members as he left the courtroom.

Guns hidden in (halal food) containers

On March 26 and May 8 authorities searched shipping containers connected to a company called Herz Enterprises, finding 152 guns and thousands of rounds of ammo hidden inside shipments of Bobcat skid loaders.

The hearing shed new light on the Department of Homeland Security’s investigation into the family, revealing that Ali Herz reportedly confessed after his arrest Tuesday to organizing two shipments of guns to Lebanon in 2014 and another in 2015.

Special agent Daniel Tigges testified that Herz said in an interview that he expected after the third shipment that the group would have netted $380,000 from the smuggling operation.

Tigges said Herz claimed he took half the profits and split the rest with his son, Adam, and brother, Bassem.

“He admitted that he knew it was wrong to ship guns out of the country,” he said.

In front of the packed courtroom, Murphy, the prosecutor, displayed a photo found on Ali Herz’s Facebook page of Hezbollah founding member Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah. At another point, he showed a picture of a pristine multi-story house in Lebanon with a neatly manicured lawn that Herz’s defense attorney said he built “brick by brick.”

It’s suspicious that Herz owned a pristine house in a violent country, Murphy said.

“It makes one wonder what the connections are that allows that to go on,” he said. “At a minimum, what is going on here is these people are selling firearms for huge, huge profits.”

Cedar Rapids Police detective John Matias testified about years-old reports authorities took detailing suspicious behavior by Ali and Bassem Herz.

In March 2010, an informant reported to the Federal Bureau of Investigation that Bassem Herz asked through Facebook whether the informant could obtain rifles with attached grenade launchers, Matias said. The informant reported that Herz said he wanted the guns to turn a profit.

Conflicting portraits

Dueling portraits of Ali emerged from witnesses and his attorney; one as potentially deadly and another as a hardworking father who spent time volunteering to help displaced Iraqi families resettle in Cedar Rapids.

In 2003, Herz’s now ex-wife, Roberta, was interviewed by federal agents and a Cedar Rapids detective, telling them that in 1992 she saw her husband meet with approximately 10 men at a Lebanese apartment complex owned by Herz’s father while the two visited the country.

She reported that at least two of the men carried “assault-style” rifles during the meeting, Matias said.

“She said afterwards she was told by Ali that they were Hezbollah,” the detective said.

Tigges also testified that Roberta Herz told authorities that Ali threatened to kill their adult daughter after she married a non-Muslim. But on cross-examination from Laverty, Tigges said “to his knowledge” the daughter, who lives in Cedar Rapids, was never questioned about the reported death threat as part of the investigation.

Zeaiter, who listened through headphones to a translator, handled finances for the operation, Murphy said.

When the apartment she and Bassem Herz share was raided Tuesday, authorities found a ledger with firearms, quantities and resale prices written in Zeaiter’s hand. The prosecutor also alleged that Bassem Herz and Zeaiter took their baby along on gun buys as a strategic mask and showed surveillance video of the three together buying firearms at a Scheels All Sports.

“What’s more innocent than a young person with their baby, just coming out to buy guns,” Murphy said.

 

Boston Marathon bomber gets death penalty

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via Dzhokhar Tsarnaev sentenced to death for Boston Marathon bombings – Massachusetts news – Boston.com.

Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has been sentenced to death.

Tsarnaev, who was convicted last month of 17 capital charges, was sentenced to death for six of them. Jurors deliberated for about 14 hours over the course of three days. He showed no visible reaction as the sentence was read aloud.

With the death sentence, Tsarnaev’s case will automatically be appealed to a higher federal court. That likely begins a series of appeals that could take years to resolve.

The federal government currently has a moratorium on all executions, and has not executed a death row inmate since 2003. Timothy McVeigh, convicted in the Oklahoma City bombing, was executed in 2001 after spending four years on federal death row.

Prosecutors presented “aggravating” factors — including the vulnerability and age of the victims, the crime’s premeditation, and Tsarnaev’s lack of remorse — that they said should result Tsarnaev receiving the death penalty. Survivors of the bombing and family and friends of victims gave dramatic testimony about all that they had lost in the destruction.

“No remorse. No apology,” prosecutor Steven Mellin said in closing statements, referring to the note Tsarnaev wrote while hiding in a boat after the bombings.

“He had already decided that killing innocents was justified. In fact, killing innocents was the whole point.”

In response, defense attorneys argued several “mitigating” factors, including Tsarnaev’s young age (he was 19 at the time of the bombings) and his lack of a criminal record. Attorneys particularly concentrated on the domineering influence of Tsarnaev’s older brother Tamerlan, who died after a shootout with police and after being hit by a speeding SUV driven by his younger brother. They also highlighted praise from Tsarnaev’s teachers, friends, and extended family, who described him as a thoughtful and sweet young man.

“Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is not the worst of the worst. And that’s who the death penalty is reserved for,” attorney Judy Clarke said in closing arguments. “Dzhokhar has potential for redemption.”

The jury’s decision ends a trial more than two years in the making. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and his older brother Tamerlan killed four people and injured more than 260 in the April 2013 bombing and its aftermath.

“I hope this verdict provides a small amount of closure to the survivors, families, and all impacted by the violent and tragic events surrounding the 2013 Boston Marathon,” Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said.

Tsarnaev was charged with 30 counts related to the bombing of the Boston Marathon, 17 of which carried the possibility of the death penalty. He was found responsible of the murder of Martin Richard, Lingzi Lu, Krystle Campbell, and Sean Collier.

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More:

In the end, the jury sentenced Tsarnaev specifically for the bomb he placed in front of the Forum restaurant on Boylston Street that killed 8-year-old Martin Richard and Lingzi Lu, a 23-year-old Boston University graduate student from China.

The jury chose life sentences for the charges Tsarnaev faced that related to the bomb that was placed by his older brother, Tamerlan — the bomb that killed Krystle Marie Campbell, 29, of Arlington.

They also did not impose a death sentence on the charges that involved the fatal shooting of MIT police officer Sean Collier.

Iowa: 4 Muslims arrested for smuggling guns to Syria in halal food container

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Halal food firm Midamar in the middle of more criminal activity.  via US Charges 4 After Intercepting Gun Shipments to Lebanon – ABC News.

Four relatives were charged in Iowa on Tuesday with conspiring to smuggle guns and ammunition to Lebanon that were hidden with equipment exports and supplies for Syrian refugees.

Federal agents intercepted cargo containers in March and again last week that were bound for Beirut carrying a total of 152 firearms and 16,000 rounds of ammunition, according to a criminal complaint unsealed Tuesday.

The suspects were identified as Ali Herz, 50 and his 22-year-old son, Adam Herz; Ali Herz’s younger brother, Bassem Herz, 29; and Bassam Herz’s wife, Al Sarah Zeaiter, 24. All four live in Cedar Rapids, where they were arrested Tuesday as local, state and federal officers executed search warrants in the city.

During initial court appearances Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Linda Reade ordered them jailed pending a detention hearing set for Friday.

“We believe there is immense risk to public safety,” said Assistant U.S. Attorney Rich Murphy.

The four said little in court, where they appeared in street clothes, their wrists handcuffed and legs shackled. Their attorneys declined to comment on the allegations following the hearing.

The complaint says the four came under suspicion as they stockpiled more than $100,000 worth of guns and ammunition legally purchased from dealers in eastern Iowa over the last 17 months. A gun store owner in February expressed concerns to authorities after the group twice purchased all of his store’s 5.7 millimeter ammunition. One of the men also requested accessories for military-style rifles after reviewing a text message written in a foreign language, the owner reported.

On Tuesday, agents searched a pizza shop linked to Bassem Herz; a Cedar Rapids address tied to Adam Herz; and Midamar Corp., a maker of halal foods whose shipping service the alleged conspirators used to transport the firearms.

No one with Midamar was charged in the alleged plot. Midamar attorney Michael Lahammer said company employees were unaware the weapons were in the containers and weren’t involved with packing them. He said a company named in the complaint, Herz Enterprises, contracted with Midamar to use its shipping facility, which is made available to other exporters.

Midamar was “used to facilitate this illegal activity by Herz Enterprises, if what the government says is true,” he said.

The firearms found in March were hidden inside of a container that had three skid loaders that were being exported and Midamar boxes marked “Syria” that were filled with clothing, shoes, honey and household supplies.

Midamar made arrangements to ship the container after its founder, Bill Aossey, promoted a clothing drive for Syrian refugees stranded in Lebanon, the complaint says. In an online posting seeking donations, Aossey wrote that the supplies would be added to an equipment container already scheduled for export.

After the container arrived by train at a seaport in Norfolk, Virginia, investigators found 53 guns and 6,800 rounds of ammunition during a March 26 inspection.

Last week, agents searched a container the suspects had brought to Midamar for shipment that had 99 firearms, over 9,500 rounds of ammunition and firearms parts and accessories that were hidden in skid loaders and inside suitcases and boxes that contained clothing.

The four suspects, who are in the United States legally, are not licensed to sell or export firearms, the complaint says. An earlier shipment wasn’t intercepted, and investigators cannot account for dozens of weapons they purchased.

The Herzes previously caught attention for their ties abroad.

Ali Herz, who was born in Lebanon, had $61,400 in cash on him when he returned to the U.Ss from overseas in December and has sent and received $160,000 in wire transfers over the last two years, the complaint says. Adam Herz, a college student born in the United States, was questioned after returning to the U.S. in 2012 and 2014 from what he said were lengthy visits to Lebanon. Bassem Herz, who was born in Kuwait, has made many trips abroad and previously exported other equipment to Lebanon. Zeaiter said she is a citizen of Lebanon who is a college student.

More via Officials carry out raids at Midamar.

Firearms seized by authorities

Name First purchase Last purchase Firearms purchased Firearms seized
Adam Herz 12/18/2014 2/27/2015 26 16
Ali Herz 12/18/2013 3/12/2015 51 34
Bassem Herz 12/18/2014 2/25/2015 32 15
Sarah Zeaiter 7/14/2014 2/23/2015 4 1
Total 12/13/2013 3/12/2015 113 66

About: Listed are the four individuals believed by authorities to have purchased firearms with the intention of shipping them to the Middle East. The table shows how many firearms each individual purchased, as well as how many of those have been seized.

h/t and more via Daniel Greenfield.

 

Phoenix: Mosque Attended by Garland Jihadis Spawned Two Other Terrorists

via Phoenix Mosque Attended by Garland Jihadists Previously Spawned Two Other Terrorists | PJ Tatler.

By Patrick Poole

Yesterday at PJ Media, I reported on conflicting stories offered by the Islamic Community Center of Phoenix (ICCP) regarding former mosque attendees Elton Simpson and Nadir Soofi, who were killed this past Sunday in a gunfight outside a Dallas-area center where a “Draw Muhammad” cartoon contest was being held.

I noted the attempts by the mosque president, Usama Shami, to downplay the ties of the two would-be terrorists. This included Shami’s claim to the press that neither was a regular member. In fact, Elton “Ibrahim” Simpson had been featured in a mosque fundraising video posted on ICCP’s YouTube channel in 2012 identifying him as a member:

In fact, Simpson and Soofi were not the only two terrorists spawned from ICCP. Two other previous ICCP mosque attendees — Hassan Abu-Jihaad and Derrick Shareef — are currently in federal prison on terrorism-related charges.

There are remarkable parallels with Simpson and Soofi, including that Abu-Jihaad and Shareef were also roommates.

Further, Usama Shami attempted to downplay their association with ICCP as well. He told the Arizona Republic he never saw the pair – despite court records in both their cases stating they had attended the mosque.

Abu-Jihaad is currently serving a 10-year federal prison sentence for passing classified information to a UK-based al-Qaeda webmaster. According to the Justice Department:

In 2001, Abu-Jihaad was serving as a U.S. Navy signalman aboard the U.S.S. Benfold and had access to the future movements of his group of ships, led by the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Constellation. Six months after the attack on the U.S.S. Cole, and before leaving home port in San Diego for a deployment in the Persian Gulf, Abu-Jihaad transmitted then-classified information about his battle group’s itinerary, listing dates for anticipated port calls in Hawaii and Australia, and for the battle group’s transit through the Strait of Hormuz. Abu-Jihaad’s disclosure discussed the battle group’s perceived vulnerability to terrorist attack.

The leak did not come to light until well after Abu-Jihaad left the Navy, when an investigation into Azzam Publications led to the search of a London apartment associated with one of the website’s organizers, and authorities found a floppy disk containing the U.S. Navy information. Subsequent investigation uncovered several email exchanges from late 2000 to late 2001 between members of Azzam Publications and Abu-Jihaad, including discussions regarding videos Abu-Jihaad ordered from Azzam Publications that promoted violent jihad and extolled the virtues of martyrdom; a donation of money Abu-Jihaad made to Azzam Publications; and whether it was “safe” to send materials to Abu-Jihaad at his military address onboard the U.S.S. Benfold.

The FBI established a direct tie between Abu-Jihaad and Simpson according to court documents in the latter’s 2010 trial, as Simpson was first questioned by the FBI in 2006 when authorities believed he might be part of a terror cell:

In 2006, agents opened a criminal investigation of him based on his ties with an individual “whom the FBI believed was attempting to set up a terrorist cell in Arizona,” according to court documents.

Agents say Simpson knew Hassan Abu-Jihaad, an enlistee in the U.S. Navy later convicted of leaking classified information about upcoming movements of his battle group to an alleged terror cell in London. Simpson told agents he knew Abu-Jihaad, who was arrested in Phoenix in 2007, but did not tell them anything else about him.

Undoubtedly, what launched that 2006 investigation was the activity of Abu-Jihaad’s former roommate, Derrick Shareef.

Shareef was arrested in 2006 for his role in a plot to set off hand grenades at a Rockford, Illinois shopping mall during the holiday season. He later pled guilty on a charge of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction, and was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

During his trial, the FBI provided video tapes of Shareef threatening Americans:

“You are the enemies of Islam, for the sake of Allah we are coming for you,” Shareef says in a tape that looks like it could have been shot somewhere in the Middle East. In fact, the camera was 90 miles from Chicago in a Rockford home where the 22-year-old and a friend each made several videos declaring their desire for destruction.

“We will target you in your homes. We will target you in your businesses. We will target you in your synagogues and your churches. We do not fear you Kafirs. I swear by Allah I am ready to give my life right now for the cause,” the tape says.

The mosque also came under scrutiny in March 2008, when a large group of men from ICCP began firing semi-automatic weapons in an open area frequented by runners and bikers near a residential area, as the Arizona Republic reported at the time:

Shortly before noon on a sunny Sunday in March, two Toyota SUVs rolled to a stop along a dirt road in north Phoenix.

About 20 young Muslim males climbed out, armed with assault rifles, a shotgun, a sniper rifle and handguns. The location near Happy Valley Road and 51st Avenue is a desert recreation site for off-road motorists, hikers and bikers, dozens of whom were enjoying the spring-like weather.

For more than an hour, the shooters blasted away at a granite rock and empty cans in front of a hill.

Officials estimate the fusillade totaled 500 to 1,000 rounds. Some shooters left before police arrived and detained 10 adults and five boys, including an 11-year-old.

The young men and boys told officers the weapons belonged to their parents. They said they were not aware it was illegal to use firearms in the residential area.

Six were arrested and charged with felony weapons violations in Maricopa County Superior Court. Among them were the 20- and 21-year-old sons of two imams at Phoenix-area mosques, as well as the 20-year-old son of Abdallah.

Needless to say, the usual suspects claimed the men were being targeted because of their Islamic faith, rather than their firing rifles in a prohibited area that endangered others.

ICCP officials would most likely claim that the case of the “Draw Muhammad” terrorists coming out of their mosque, as had a traitor betraying classified military secrets to al-Qaeda, and a man planning a terror attack on a shopping mall during the holidays, is a matter of bad luck.

But one of the main tools used by terror recruiters is the Islamic grievance narrative that Muslims are under attack from the West.

In fact, ICCP regularly hosts speakers pushing that Islamic grievance narrative, such as the February 2013 appearance of Lauren Booth:

As I reported here at PJ Media in 2012, Booth had been interviewed in a California mosque spouting Jew-hatred, making anti-American statements, and calling President Obama a murderer:

Interestingly, the man interviewing Booth in that video, my friend Tom Trento of the United West, was broadcasting live inside the “Draw Muhammad” event on Sunday when it came under attack by Simpson and Soofi, and he continued giving live video updates as the situation unfolded.

So while ICCP officials may call the four terrorists that have come from their mosque a tragic coincidence, others may call it a pattern. Or as my law enforcement colleagues would describe it, an “investigative clue.”

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