Dearborn Heights Muslim planned jihad attack on Detroit mega church

Source: Dearborn Heights ISIS supporter planned to attack Detroit church

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ISIS tawhid salute

DEARBORN HEIGHTS, Mich. – Federal authorities arrested a Dearborn Heights resident for his allegiance to ISIS by monitoring his twitter account and gun purchases.

Khalil Abu-Rayyan, 22, is being held on gun and drug charges.

The arrest comes after twitter announced it suspended 125,000 ISIS-related accounts over the past six months.

The Feds said they’ve been watching Abu-Rayyan since last May.

Abu Rayyan was having online conversations with an undercover FBI agent.

“I tried to shoot up a church one day,” Abu-Rayyan posted. “It’s one of the biggest ones in Detroit. I had it planned out. I bought a bunch of bullets. I practiced reloading and unloading.”

The complaint filed in federal court doesn’t specify which Detroit Church he was allegedly planning to attack, only that is was close and could seat 6,000 members.

The complaint quotes Abu-Rayyan saying:

“It’s easy, and a lot of people go there. Plus people are not allowed to carry guns in church. Plus it would make the news. Everybody would’ve heard. Honestly I regret not doing it. If I can’t do jihad in the Middle East, I would do my jihad over here.”

The complaint also says that he told the agent he had armed himself with a large knife and would behead people if he needed to.

“It is my dream to behead someone,” he told the agent.

The complaint can be viewed here.


Yet, once again, and here too, a Muslim in the U.S. plotted to kill Americans yet was NOT charged with any terror-related crimes.

 

 

DHS ordered agent to delete records of 100’s of Muslims with terror ties

So much for vetting. via: DHS ordered me to scrub records of Muslims with terror ties | TheHill

By Philip Haney

Amid the chaos of the 2009 holiday travel season, jihadists planned to slaughter 290 innocent travelers on a Christmas Day flight from the Netherlands to Detroit, Michigan. Twenty-three-year old Nigerian Muslim Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab intended to detonate Northwest Airlines Flight 253, but the explosives in his underwear malfunctioned and brave passengers subdued him until he could be arrested. The graphic and traumatic defeat they planned for the United States failed, that time.

Following the attempted attack, President Obama threw the intelligence community under the bus for its failure to “connect the dots.” He said, “this was not a failure to collect intelligence, it was a failure to integrate and understand the intelligence that we already had.”

Most Americans were unaware of the enormous damage to morale at the Department of Homeland Security, where I worked, his condemnation caused. His words infuriated many of us because we knew his administration had been engaged in a bureaucratic effort to destroy the raw material—the actual intelligence we had collected for years, and erase those dots. The dots constitute the intelligence needed to keep Americans safe, and the Obama administration was ordering they be wiped away.After leaving my 15 year career at DHS, I can no longer be silent about the dangerous state of America’s counter-terror strategy, our leaders’ willingness to compromise the security of citizens for the ideological rigidity of political correctness—and, consequently, our vulnerability to devastating, mass-casualty attack.

Just before that Christmas Day attack, in early November 2009, I was ordered by my superiors at the Department of Homeland Security to delete or modify several hundred records of individuals tied to designated Islamist terror groups like Hamas from the important federal database, the Treasury Enforcement Communications System (TECS). These types of records are the basis for any ability to “connect dots.”  Every day, DHS Customs and Border Protection officers watch entering and exiting many individuals associated with known terrorist affiliations, then look for patterns. Enforcing a political scrubbing of records of Muslims greatly affected our ability to do that. Even worse, going forward, my colleagues and I were prohibited from entering pertinent information into the database.

A few weeks later, in my office at the Port of Atlanta, the television hummed with the inevitable Congressional hearings that follow any terrorist attack. While members of Congress grilled Obama administration officials, demanding why their subordinates were still failing to understand the intelligence they had gathered, I was being forced to delete and scrub the records. And I was well aware that, as a result, it was going to be vastly more difficult to “connect the dots” in the future—especially beforean attack occurs.

As the number of successful and attempted Islamic terrorist attacks on America increased, the type of information that the Obama administration ordered removed from travel and national security databases was the kind of information that, if properly assessed, could have prevented subsequent domestic Islamist attacks like the ones committed by Faisal Shahzad (May 2010), Detroit “honor killing” perpetrator Rahim A. Alfetlawi (2011); Amine El Khalifi, who plotted to blow up the U.S. Capitol (2012); Dzhokhar or Tamerlan Tsarnaev who conducted the Boston Marathon bombing (2013); Oklahoma beheading suspect Alton Nolen (2014); or Muhammed Yusuf Abdulazeez, who opened fire on two military installations in Chattanooga, Tennessee (2015).

It is very plausible that one or more of the subsequent terror attacks on the homeland could have been prevented if more subject matter experts in the Department of Homeland Security had been allowed to do our jobs back in late 2009. It is demoralizing—and infuriating—that today, those elusive dots are even harder to find, and harder to connect, than they were during the winter of 2009.

Haney worked at the Department of Homeland Security for 15 years.


Some interviews with Haney below the fold.

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Michigan: Muslim women use Islamic garb to shoplift (video)

h/t IOTWReport & Dee

Michigan: 3 Unidentified Boys Leave Death Threat in Locker of Dearborn Middle School Student

via Dearborn middle school students disciplined for leaving threat in classmate’s locker  h/t Shoebat

DEARBORN, Mich. – Brianna Lyons, an 8th-grader at Stout Middle School, opened her locker Monday morning to find a handwritten note that threatened  to kill her and her entire family.

The school reacted immediately by notifying her parents and police. Dearborn police have identified three boys who they say are responsible. One will not be returning to school and two others are currently suspended with the possibility of criminal charges.

While the family has nothing but praise for how the threat was handled Monday, it has clearly shaken them. Brianna’s mother, Carol, was dumbfounded by the note.

“I never thought I would have to go through this with my kids because we try to protect them all the time,” Carol Lyons said.

Why the boys sent the note is a mystery, but motive isn’t really the issue here. Dearborn Police Chief Ron Haddad said this kind of threat will not be tolerated and will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

Brianna is a strong student at Stout Middle School. She’s active in orchestra and cheerleading and has a band concert this week. She’s going to school and said she’s going to try and concentrate on the music, not on the note.


It’s no mystery.

Michigan: Muslim prayer room raises questions…at Catholic school

Sharia creeps in many ways, some more subtle than others, but it never rests and all methods serve the same purpose. Submission. via: Some parents question Muslim prayer at Brother Rice High School in Bloomfield Hills – WXYZ.com

BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich. (WXYZ) – It may surprise some to learn Brother Rice High School in Bloomfield Hills has a dozen or so Muslim students.

It has been that way, say leaders, for many years.

But questions have recently been raised, primarily by about a dozen or so angry parents, over a prayer room, which allows those Muslim students to pray on a Catholic school’s property.

“When the question was ‘Is there a place that I can pray?’, the answer that evolved was yes,” says school president John Birney. “We have this ‘sacred space’ available for you if you want it,” he remembers telling students.

That prayer room is not just for Muslims. Students of other non-Catholic faiths have used it too says Birney.

He and 7 Action News have fielded some of those parental complaints. One emailing to us called the prayer room “unconscionable” – saying her child’s paid religious education would be “undermined.”

The school says they haven’t heard from any students who have had any opinions on this one way or the other, rather its pretty much just those parents raising questions.

“My quick response is, all Catholic schools have as part of their admissions that they don’t discriminate based on race, creed, color,” says Birney.

Of those parents, “I respect your opinion, I need to talk to experts in the field before we finalize what we choose to do.”

He says he has been in touch with the Archdiocese of Detroit and is waiting on more perspective.

“Is this something that compromises our faith and identity, or is it in fact consistent with the respect that we have. We are Catholic in the sense that we share the good news, we are not Catholic in the sense, ‘Hey if you’re not Catholic don’t bother coming here’,” Birney adds.

He says those Muslim students must conform to the Catholic curriculum required of all students and they have, he says, they respect the Catholic faith, so current thinking is, the school should respect theirs.

Residents say Islamic ‘call to prayer’ too loud in first U.S. city taken over by Muslims

Turns out one of the mosques in question wasn’t supposed to be a mosque – they pulled a zoning jihad on the city before it was run by Muslims. Now they are threatening legal jihad after being exposed.

Source: Residents complain that ‘call to prayer’ is too loud | Hamtramck Review

By Charles Sercombe The debate over the Muslim call to prayer is reverberating once again.

At last week’s city council meeting, several residents of the Hamtramck Senior Plaza apartments on Holbrook complained about the volume level of the call to prayer coming from the Ideal Islamic Center, located across from the apartment complex.

Jeanette Powell said she’s not complaining as a way to “bash anyone’s religion.”

She said the call or prayer was broadcast at 6 a.m. and found the volume “overbearing.”

“Just turn it down a little bit.”

Carol Marsh said not only was the call to prayer too loud, she insisted that the organizers of the center never said it would serve as a mosque.

“We were lied to,” she said. “We were told it would never be turned into a mosque.”

But Sakrul Islam of the center said no one ever said it would not be a mosque, saying an Islamic center “covers everything.”

He warned Marsh that if she continued claiming she was lied to he would file a defamation lawsuit.

He also denied accusations that the call to prayer was broadcast earlier than 6 a.m. Islam said he has since turned down the volume when the police department informed him of the complaints.

Islam accused City Councilmember Robert Zwolak, who lives in the apartment complex, of whipping up complaints.

“He’s against Muslims,” he said.

The center on Holbrook was not the only mosque accused of broadcasting the call too loudly.

Susan Dunn, who is a candidate for city council, said the new mosque on St. Aubin St., the Abu-Bakr Al-Siddique Islamic Center, also broadcasts the call loudly. Dunn lives on Hewitt St., which is a block away from the center.

She said she asked neighbors who attend services at the center to tell organizers there to turn down the volume.

Since then, she said, it’s been “turned down some.”

The complaints launched a long discussion on the city’s noise ordinance and the ordinance regulating the call to prayer.

According to Councilmember Cathie Gordon the city’s ordinance has no teeth.

Police Chief Max Garbarino said the way he’s been dealing with the issue is to talk with mosque leaders and ask them to turn down the volume.

The call to prayer issue first came up in 2004 when city officials were considering an ordinance regulating it. At that time, there was a heated debate over the issue.

Eventually, the city council at the time OK’d the ordinance. But that decision was challenged after Zwolak, who was not a member of council at the time, led a successful petition drive to put the matter up to a ballot vote.

Voters approved the ordinance by a 55 to 45 percent margin.

The issue also attracted national and international attention. Periodically, residents complain about the volume of the call to prayer, mostly from the mosque located on Caniff near Jos. Campau.


In first majority-Muslim U.S. city, calls to prayer from & no alcohol sales near mosques

Michigan: Hamtramck is first American city to elect majority Muslim council

Muslim after Michigan city takeover:  “Today we show the Polish and everybody else”

Michigan: Islamic call to prayer broadcast in Hamtramck (video)

Meanwhile, in Louisiana, Church slapped with criminal summons over worship service ‘noise’.

In first majority-Muslim U.S. city, calls to prayer from & no alcohol sales near mosques

Sharia crept in. Good luck getting it out. This is the fate of every U.S. city that continues to allow Muslim immigration and refugees. via In the first majority-Muslim U.S. city, residents tense about its future – The Washington Post

Let that title sink. The “first majority-Muslim U.S. city.” As titled by the Washington Post. November 21, 2015. A mere 14 years after 9/11 the first city has fallen.

wapo-first-muslim-us-city

Karen Majewski was in such high demand in her vintage shop on a recent Saturday afternoon that a store employee threw up her hands when yet another visitor came in to chat. Everyone wanted to talk to the mayor about the big political news.

Earlier this month, the blue-collar city that has been home to Polish Catholic immigrants and their descendents for more than a century became what demographers think is the first jurisdiction in the nation to elect a
majority-Muslim council.

It’s the second tipping for Hamtramck (pronounced Ham-tram-ik), which in 2013 earned the distinction becoming of what appears to be the first majority-Muslim city in the United States following the arrival of thousands of immigrants from Yemen, Bangladesh and Bosnia over a decade.

In many ways, Hamtramck is a microcosm of the fears gripping parts of the country since the Islamic State’s attacks on Paris: The influx of Muslims here has profoundly unsettled some residents of the town long known for its love of dancing, beer, paczki pastries and the pope.

Majewski, whose family emigrated from Poland in the early 20th century, admitted to a few concerns of her own. Business owners within 500 feet of one of Hamtramck’s four mosques can’t obtain a liquor license, she complained, a notable development in a place that flouted Prohibition-era laws by openly operating bars. The restrictions could thwart efforts to create an entertainment hub downtown, said the pro-commerce mayor.

And while Majewski advocated to allow mosques to issue calls to prayer, she understands why some longtime residents are struggling to adjust to the sound that echos through the city’s streets five times each day.

“There’s definitely a strong feeling that Muslims are the other,” she said. “It’s about culture, what kind of place Hamtramck will become. There’s definitely a fear, and to some degree, I share it.”

Saad Almasmari, a 28-year-old from Yemen who became the fourth Muslim elected to the six-member city council this month, doesn’t understand that fear.

“I don’t know why people keep putting religion into politics,” said Almasmari, who received the highest percentage of votes (22 percent) of any candidate. “When we asked for votes, we didn’t ask what their religion was.”

Hamtramck’s exceedingly low home prices and relatively low crime rate have proved especially attractive to new immigrants, whose presence is visible everywhere. Most of the women strolling Joseph Campau Avenue wear hijabs, or headscarves, and niqabs, veils that leave only the area around the eyes open. Many of the markets advertise their wares in Arabic or Bengali, and some display signs telling customers that owners will return shortly — gone to pray, much in the same way Polish businesses once signaled that employees had gone to Mass.

Many longtime residents point to 2004 as the year they suspected that the town’s culture had shifted irrevocably. It was then that the city council gave permission to al-Islah Islamic Center to broadcast its call to prayer from speakers atop its roof.

“The Polish people think we were invading them,” said Masud Khan, one of the mosque’s leaders, recalling that time in an interview earlier this month. “We were a big threat to their religion and culture. Now their days are gone.”

The mosque, which attracts about 500 people for its Friday prayer services, has purchased a neighboring vacant limestone building in the heart of the city that once was a furniture store. The mosque’s leaders plan to put a minaret — a spire — on the building and use it to continue broadcasting a call to prayer five times a day.

The private sale enraged city leaders, including the mayor, who sees the area as key to commercial growth. Mosque leaders estimate that the 20,000-square-foot building will hold up to 2,000 people once the renovation is finished next year.

The town’s transformation caught Mike Bugaj off guard. When the Hamtramck native left to join the Air Force in 1972, the city was widely referred to as “Little Warsaw.” When he returned from the military in 1995, “the Muslims were here,” said Bugaj, who is of Polish and Native American descent.

The new majority Muslim council has Bugaj worried that old traditions, like the Polish festival and Fat Tuesday’s paczki day, soon will be wiped away.

He and other residents are “concerned about what they would want to change, that they could mistreat women,” said Bugaj, who wore feather earrings and a T-shirt with wolves on it. “Don’t come over to America and try to turn people to your way of thinking.”

Wayne Little, who has been a pastor for nearly 40 years at Corinthian Baptist Church, said many of the city’s African American residents are also waiting to see whether the new Muslim-majority city council will represent their interests.

“They are clannish and stick together. . . . The jury is out on them.” Little said.

The discord intensified in the weeks before the election, beginning when several senior citizens living in an apartment complex complained about the volume of the 6 a.m. call to prayer from a nearby mosque.

Susan Dunn, who was on her fifth unsuccessful run for city council, raised the issue before the governing body.

“I have my own rights, as well,” she said while baking her son’s birthday cake in her kitchen. “I’m not a hater. It wasn’t a calculated move.”

At one point as she spoke, a mosque close to Dunn’s house began broadcasting the call to prayer. “You try reading a book in your back yard while your dog is barking to that,” Dunn said, clearly exasperated.

 

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