DOJ Hires Imam Who Called For Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s Death

…to teach classes to Muslim convicts.

via Imam Who Called For Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s Death Teaches Muslims | The Daily Caller.

An Egyptian-born imam who in 2007 said that Somali-born activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali should receive the death penalty for her criticism of Islam is now a Department of Justice contractor hired to teach classes to Muslims who are in federal prison.

According to federal spending records, Fouad ElBayly, the imam at Islamic Center of Johnstown in Pennsylvania, was contracted by the DOJ’s Bureau of Prisons beginning last year to teach the classes to Muslim inmates at Cumberland Federal Correctional Institution in Cumberland, Md.

The records show that ElBayly has two contracts worth $12,900 to teach the classes and to provide the inmates “leadership and guidance.” One of the contracts is dated Feb. 20, 2014, and the other is dated Dec. 8, 2014.

It was April 2007 when ElBayly, the imam at the Islamic Center of Johnston, protested Ali’s scheduled appearance at the University of Pittsburgh-Johnstown.

Ali, a former Dutch parliamentarian who fled Somalia with her family at a young age, has been vocal in her critique of Islam, claiming that women suffer greatly under the religion.

Those comments have angered many, including ElBayly, who called Ali’s statements “poisonous.”

“If you come into the faith, you must abide by the laws, and when you decide to defame it deliberately, the sentence is death,” the imam told a local newspaper ahead of her university visit.

ElBayly, along with Mahmood Qazi, the Islamic Center of Johnstown’s founder and past president, pressed university officials to block Ali from speaking.

“I don’t want her to poison anyone’s mind,” Qazi said. “She doesn’t believe in God. How can she talk about God?”

The men were unsuccessful, and ElBayly was heavily criticized for his comments, which gained national attention at the time. He apologized in a letter to the newspaper and seemingly resigned his post.

But that resignation was temporary, it turns out.

The federal Bureau of Prisons requires religious services contractors to provide credentials and other background information in their applications. One section asks applicants to list their associations with established religious organizations. According to recent news reports, ElBayly is once again the imam at the Islamic Center of Johnstown.

The application makes no mention of a required interview, though the document indicates that one is optional.

Besides the credentials, applicants have to provide two personal references and a letter of recommendation from their local religious organization.

Perhaps the highest hurdle for ElBayly to clear would be the program’s requirement to affirm, ”I do not endorse nor will I practice or use language in the institution that will support violence, terrorism, discrimination against other inmates.”

The Daily Caller sought to interview ElBayly, but he did not respond to an email request. A phone number listed for ElBayly was directed to a fax machine.

TheDC also wanted to find out more about how the DOJ’s Bureau of Prisons chooses who can teach religious classes to inmates, but the agency did not respond. The Cumberland facility also did not respond to specific questions about ElBayly’s classes.

 

Ohio: Brother of Muslim terror suspect arrested after threatening jail guard during visit

via Man visiting terror suspect charged with making threatening gesture toward jail guard | The Columbus Dispatch. h/t Jihad Watch

A man visiting a Franklin County jail inmate accused of aiding terrorists was arrested himself after deputies say he made a threatening gesture at a guard.

Abdiqani A. Aden, 18, is charged with a misdemeanor count of aggravated menacing. A deputy wrote in charging documents filed yesterday that Aden held his fingers and thumb out like a gun and gestured as if shooting, while speaking in a foreign language.

Aden posted a $10,000 bond set in Municipal Court this morning.

He was visiting Abdirahman S. Mohamud, 23, at the Downtown jail just before 7 p.m. on Friday when the incident occurred, a sheriff’s office spokeswoman said. She didn’t know the relationship between the two men.

Mohamud is charged with one count of soliciting or providing support for acts of terror, a third-degree felony, and one count of money laundering in support of terrorism, a fifth-degree felony.

Mohamud [the already jailed brother], who was born in Somalia but is a U.S. citizen, is being held on $1 million bail.

Virginia: Muslim teen arrested recruiting for Islamic State terror group

Just a few days ago, another Muslim teen, in Minnesota, pled guilty to joining ISIS.  via Teen accused of being ISIS recruiter

A 17-year-old Virginia student has been charged with helping recruit for ISIS, federal law enforcement officials said Wednesday.

The teen, whose name was not disclosed, was taken into custody last week, the officials said.

Prosecutors are seeking to charge him as an adult but currently have charged him as a juvenile, one of the law enforcement officials said.

The case remains under seal. It was first reported by The Washington Post on Wednesday.

The Post, citing officials and neighbors, reported that investigators spent more than a month watching the teen and his home before he was arrested.

The teen, who lives in a Virginia suburb of Washington, is accused of helping a slightly older adult travel to Syria. The adult is believed to have joined ISIS there, a separate law enforcement official said.

The teen is also accused of distributing ISIS messages to a network of contacts, one of the officials said.

Former boss: He didn’t seem radical

The teen is an “intelligent kid,” a man who hired him to write for a digital currency news website said Wednesday evening. Dustin O’Bryant, the editor of the website Coin Brief from Alabama, said: “He did not come across as radical in any way.”

The teen wrote freelance articles for the website for seven months last year. He was told not to bring religion into his writing, O’Bryant said, adding he had noticed the young man had written online posts about his faith. The teen complied, he said.

The website editor said he was “extremely, extremely surprised” to learn of the arrest from reporters calling him. He hadn’t spoken to the teen since February, when the young man said he was dealing with personal matters but wanted to start writing for the website again at some point this year.

Give me two weeks to three months, the boy told him.

O’Bryant said he is shocked by the charge.

“I hope there’s some sort of misunderstanding here, and that he didn’t know what he was doing,” he said.

He added that he didn’t realize the teen was in high school because he had college courses on his resume.

Australia: One step forward, two steps back as Islam keeps creeping down under

Last week, Australia took a step forward in controlling its Islam problem when it vowed to crack down on Muslim immigration, terrorists and imams. This week it took two steps backwards.

Step 1 via Australian Defence Force to get its first Muslim Imam.

The Australian Defence Force is set to get its first Muslim Imam as part of a push to attract more recruits from different cultural and language backgrounds.

Assistant Defence Minister Stuart Robert announced on Monday he was asking Defence to “renew efforts” on recruiting a more “culturally and linguistically diverse workforce”.

Part of this is to find an Imam – an Islamic religious leader – to serve on the ADF’s religious advisory committee, which provides advice to the force on policies to meet its personnel’s spiritual needs.

“I have asked my department to move as quickly as possible to identify a part-time Islamic Imam to join the ADF’s religious advisory committee to ensure those 96 ADF members of an Islamic faith have appropriate representation,” Mr Robert said in a speech to Parliament.

The part-time Imam will join one Jewish and five Christian religious leaders who make up the committee. He will serve in a policy advisory role – a first for the ADF – but will not provide pastoral care as do Christian Chaplains in the force.

He said there would also be a “dedicated recruitment strategy” to target sections of the community from which soldiers, sailors and airmen and women are not typically drawn.

Mr Robert stressed this was not about appearances or “social engineering” but rather was vital to making the ADF a better fighting force.

“This strategy … is born out of the stark reality that combat power will be enhanced,” he said.

No evidence that’s ever worked anywhere. Although Hitler created a Muslim unit.

Step 2, via KSA gives $1m in donation to Islamic Museum in Australia

The Kingdom has donated $1 million to the Islamic Museum in Australia (IMA). Presenting a check to Australian Foreign Minister Julie Joseph, Saudi Ambassador Nabil bin Mohammed Al-Saleh said the donation was given by the Saudi leadership in order to promote human values among nations in support of peaceful co-existence among all communities. Al-Saleh said that the Kingdom was interested in projecting the correct image of Islam.

The center will provide educational and cross-cultural instruction and showcase the artistic and cultural heritage of Muslims in Australia and in Muslim societies everywhere. It aims to foster community harmony and facilitate an understanding of the values and contributions of Muslims to Australian society.

Blood money? Muslims are wreaking havoc on community harmony all across Australia. Just this year already 1,000 Muslims rallied against Charlie Hebdo and the freedom of speech and a Muslim took hostages in a Sydney cafe, forcing them to hold an Islamic flag in the window and killing two.

These steps are all part of 100 years of jihad against Australia that continues to this day.

Australia: How The Hell Did We Let This Happen?

New Jersey: Muslim who claimed bias attack found guilty of setting up wife’s murder

As  we posted in 2011:

Parvaiz said he was shot by a black male, a white male and an unknown third male who shouted slurs saying that he and his wife were terrorists.

His statement to authorities changed several times, including once when he said the shooters were three black men.

“Within hours of the crime, it was obvious to investigators that this was sadly the alleged handiwork of the victim’s husband who allegedly did the unthinkable and plotted to murder his wife after a religious celebration,” Bianchi said.

Parvaiz told investigators there were issues in his marriage and he was angry at his wife for speaking negatively about his family.

In other words, an honor killing. And another fake Muslim hate crime perpetrated by…a Muslim.

More via Cheating husband found guilty of setting up wife’s murder while out walking with their young son — as it’s revealed he spent $4,500 on black magic spells to get rid of her | Daily Mail Online.

A New York City man was convicted Thursday of setting up the fatal shooting of his wife while the couple was on a walk with one of their young sons in New Jersey.

A jury deliberated for four hours before convicting Kashif Parvaiz of scheming with his girlfriend to kill his wife and make it look like a random attack.

The August 2011 shooting occurred while Parvaiz and his wife, 27-year-old Nazish Noorani, walked with their son near her family’s home in Boonton, a New Jersey suburb about 30 miles from New York that is home to a large Pakistani-American population.

Noorani was killed, Parvaiz was wounded and the boy was unharmed. The couple’s other son was with family members in the house.

‘Nothing will ever restore Nazish to her family. As her two young children grow up, they will never have their mother by their side. Her family, and most especially her siblings, will never see her again,’ Morris County Prosecutor Fredric Knapp said in a statement. ‘This verdict, however, demonstrates to all of her loved ones that justice has been served.’

Antoinette Stephen pleaded guilty to murder and other offenses and testified against Parvaiz. The Billerica, Massachusetts, resident was having an affair with Parvaiz and admitted firing the fatal shots.

Parvaiz first told police that his family had been attacked by a group of men who called them terrorists and suggested that it was a bias crime, prosecutors said. Noorani was originally from Karachi, Pakistan.

Stephen and Parvaiz exchanged text messages in the days leading up to the shooting, according to an arrest affidavit released by the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office.

‘You hang in there. Freedom is just around ur corner,’ read one text sent from a phone listed to Stephen’s father to Parvaiz, according to the affidavit.

According to Morris County Prosecutor Robert Bianchi, Parvaiz’s accounts of the attack were inconsistent and immediately raised suspicions.

Parvaiz told investigators the couple was attacked by a different combination of black and white males who shouted ethnic slurs, authorities said. In his initial story, the group shouted something about the family being ‘terrorists,’ authorities said.

Bianchi said investigators were deeply concerned when Parvaiz suggested it was a bias crime, but within hours ‘it was obvious to investigators that this was sadly the alleged handy work of the victim’s husband who allegedly did the unthinkable and plotted to murder his wife.’

Nazish Noorani lived in fear of her abusive husband as their marriage crumbled and chillingly foretold of her fate to her brother.

In a text to him she wrote: ‘I dont no wht to do. Cant talk to him cuz he abuse me than … he doesnt wanna live with me … i dont no kids get scared of him sometimes … im so tired of this … i dont no Im scared …someday u will find me dead because its cuz of kaski … he wants to kill me.’

The victim’s sister, Lubna Choudhry, cried in the hallway in the arms of her brother, Kaleem Norrani, after the verdict was read. The family did not immediately comment.

Prosecutors said during the three-week trial that Parvaiz emailed two black magic companies asking if they could come up with a way to make his wife leave him, kill herself or disappear. They said he paid at least $4,500 for spells and prayers from the company.

Parvaiz was convicted of murder, conspiracy to commit murder, endangering the welfare of a child, child abuse, hindering apprehension by lying to police and weapons charges. He faces life in prison at his sentencing, which is scheduled for April 24.

Stephen faces a minimum of 30 years in prison, but has yet to be sentenced.

 

Univ of Minnesota chooses Islamic terrorists over free speech

via You can’t make fun of terrorists at the U. of Minnesota.

No student or student group at a public university should have to fight for their First Amendment rights. But as I’m preparing for graduation in a few short months, that’s exactly what I find myself doing—fighting for the rights of my student publication.

At the Minnesota Republic, we pride ourselves in standing up for freedom of speech on campus because we might not exist without it.

“In the future, close attention may be paid to the content published by Students for a Conservative Voice to ensure that any material that is produced with student fee funds does not compromise the cultural harmony of the campus.”

Our publication, derived from the University of Minnesota’s Students for a Conservative Voice (SCV), allows students on campus to share their viewpoints no matter what—even if they are considered offensive.

And no other publication on campus can say that.

When Vice Provost of Student Affairs and Dean of Students Danita Young Brown apologized to students for a student group throwing a fiesta on the grounds that it might offend the Chicano and Latino students, we printed Goldy Gopher with a sombrero on the front cover. After the Charlie Hebdo attacks, we put a drawing of Muhammad on the cover, asking for speech over terror.

We do these things to show support for students’ right to say what they want on campus.

But the Student Service Fees Committee (SSFC) is now putting our rights in danger.

Every year student groups apply for funding from this committee, which is responsible for allocating millions of dollars. And while it’s a fight every year to secure the funding needed to print the Minnesota Republic, this year we were faced with a new challenge—the right to publish what we want.

At SCV’s budget presentation to the committee, we were asked about a back cover from an issue published in 2011 that pictured a man with a gun burning an issue of the Minnesota Republic with the words, “Terrorists hate the Minnesota Republic.”

Other than the protection afforded by the First Amendment to print such things, the SSFC even has its own rule that protects students’ rights to print content without hurting their request for funding.

And if the fees committee was following its own rules, a four-year-old newspaper cover would not have been questioned.

“While reviewing one of the sample publications, committee members came across material that demonstrated an overt lack of sensitivity to the portrayal of members of the Arab world,” SSFC’s funding recommendation to the Minnesota Republic said. “When pressed for information on how this piece made it into print, representatives informed the committee that, based on the date of this particular publication, the members responsible for that work are no longer in the organization and that this particular piece is not representative of the work produced by the organization today.”

“After assessing this information, the Student Service Fee Committee would like to emphasize for the group the significance of culturally sensitive discourse on a campus like the University of Minnesota, which prides itself on being home to a wide range of values and beliefs held by members that originate from countless cultures across the globe,” the recommendation continued. “In the future, close attention may be paid to the content published by Students for a Conservative Voice to ensure that any material that is produced with student fee funds does not compromise the cultural harmony of the campus and to ensure that the material that is produced is not at odds with the criteria in place for receiving this funding.”

I am shocked that not one person in the room during these deliberations questioned the committee’s flagrant disregard for our right to free speech as it was questioning whether or not our publication disrupts the “cultural harmony” on U of M’s campus.

It’s clear that their statement is meant to scare students on campus from publishing or saying anything that the committee might not like.

Students should be encouraged to share their views at a public university, not threatened when they do so.

Sadly, this is not the first time that the Minnesota Republic has had to deal with censorship issues at the U of M. Earlier this year, a stack of our publication was found in the garbage next to our newsstand. Our newsstands have also been vandalized and signs promoting the Minnesota Republic have been ripped up and thrown on the ground.

The Minnesota Republic has dealt with all of this, while the U of M has stood by and allowed it to happen. Whether it is offensive speech or not, all speech on a public university campus should be protected.

Students on campus should not have to feel as though the university is spying on them, waiting for a chance to strip them of their First Amendment rights. Instead, students—especially on a public campus—should be undeterred in their discourse and dialogue on any issue.

Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @AllisonMaass

American Convert to Islam Inspired Deadly Jihad Attack on KFC

By no means the first attack by Muslims on KFC.

pakistan-kfc

via Allah Versus KFC | Foreign Policy. h/t TROP

It must have seemed like a perfectly normal day for 18-year-old Boula Fawzy as he was wrapping up his shift in the KFC branch in the Egyptian town of Quesna. Fresh from high school, he had been forced to work like many young Egyptians in order to help his family. As Fawzy was finishing up in the restaurant in the early hours of Feb. 5, a motorcycle stopped on the street outside and opened fire at the facade. The gunshots were soon followed by Molotov cocktails hurled through the front window. Trapped on the second floor, Boula didn’t have a chance. He burned to death.

Since the start of the year, multinational corporations, foreign-owned banks, and cell-phone companies have become the latest targets in the ongoing battle between Islamists and the Egyptian regime. Credit for the KFC attacks and others — including a multiple coordinated bombing this week in downtown Cairo that killed one passerby — has been claimed by hitherto little-known groups that call themselves “the Popular Resistance Movement” and “Revolutionary Punishment.” Formed by disgruntled Islamist youth who are unwilling to tolerate the status quo but decline to join traditional jihadi organizations, these groups have endorsed low-level violence as a means to bring down the Egyptian regime. For months, similar young militants have targeted police vehicles and policemen with Molotov attacks, cheered on by Muslim Brothers and fellow travelers.

But why have these groups focused on attacking multinational corporations?

Why do  Islamists think burning down a KFC would  help topple the military regime of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi? Much of the answer lies with an unlikely new theoretician of Egypt’s burgeoning Islamist insurrection, a 43-year-old American (and convicted murderer) named Shahid King Bolsen. When the Popular Resistance Movement took credit for the bombings, it used slogans first popularized by Bolsen.

Bolsen’s influence stems from his innovative efforts to fuse early-21st-century anti-capitalist ideology with the tenets of ultra-conservative Salafi Islam. Islamist infatuation with radical left ideas is not new; neither is the tactic of targeting economic interests. (The jihadi insurgency of the ’90s targeted the Egyptian tourism sector.) But Bolsen’s message — widely disseminated on social media throughout the Arabic-speaking world — aims to go much further. He has succeeded in Islamifying a far-left discourse about the evils of global “neo-liberalism,” singling out nefarious multinational corporations, rather than governments, as the real enemies of Muslims. “Egypt is today being invaded and occupied by a neoliberal crusade,” he writes.

bolsen-cropped

Born Shannon Morris in Boulder, Colorado in 1971, he was raised as a Catholic by his mother after their father abandoned the family in 1983 to pursue a screenwriting career in California. His family would later recall that, even as a young man, Shannon was deeply troubled by social injustice and the gap between America’s rich and poor. He spent long hours in the local library reading about Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. Finishing high school, he attended Metropolitan State University of Denver, where he studied political science and became involved in various social projects. The story of the political and religious journey of Malcolm X awakened Bolsen’s interest in Islam, and in early 1997 he converted, later attributing this to Islam’s generosity towards the poor.

A Pakistani from Bolsen’s local mosque suggested a new name: “Shahid” is the Arabic word for “martyr,” “King” stands for Martin Luther King, and “Bolsen” is his mother’s maiden name. Interestingly, he has now stopped using “King,” since his former idol’s emphasis on non-violence stands in obvious contradiction to his new persona. At the time he was working as a reporter for the Rocky Mountain News, a local newspaper no longer in print. It was there that he met his wife, Asya. Eight years his elder, Asya was a Palestinian from Gaza who had won a fellowship to the United States and was interning for the newspaper. The two quickly fell in love. They were married in a ceremony in Gaza in June 1997.

Bolsen now began to fuse his anti-capitalist views with his new religious faith. His writings from this period range from a 1999 article on how the IMF controls Pakistan to an April 2001 anti-Israeli rant. In 2001 he took his family to Ann Arbor, Michigan, to live among the city’s Muslim community. He found employment with the now defunct Islamic Association of North America, where he oversaw outreach efforts to non-Muslims and led Friday prayers in local prisons. He also ran IANARadio, an Islamic news and information website. In June 2001, Bolsen traveled to London, where he gave talks on Palestine.

By 2003, Bolsen was feeling frustrated with his life in America. He would later claim that he was being pursued by the FBI (though there is no evidence to support the claim). At the time he only indicated that he wanted to live and raise his children in a Muslim country. In March 2003, Bolsen took his wife and three children and moved to the United Arab Emirates. Life was good at first. He opened an internet café and rented a villa. Soon, however, his business failed, and the money began to run out.

In early 2006, Bolsen created a profile on a social networking site posing as his maid. The profile suggested that its owner was a Middle Eastern woman living in Dubai and looking for a sexual encounter with a Western man. Martin Herbert Steiner, a German engineer, had just moved to Dubai from Singapore. Feeling lonely, he contacted the profile owner. E-mails and phone messages were exchanged, and the two agreed to meet. Bolsen’s wife and children were visiting family in Gaza.

In his subsequent confessions to the police, Bolsen claimed that he merely wanted to shame Steiner out of his “sinful ways.” What exactly happened in the house remains unclear. Bolsen claimed that he didn’t intend to kill Steiner, and that he had used a cloth soaked in chloroform to subdue the other man only after he had tried to force himself on Bolsen’s housekeeper. The housekeeper later testified that, after killing Steiner, Bolsen had told her, “Don’t worry, but say ‘God is Great,’ for an infidel is dead.” In his current recounting of the episode, Bolsen says simply that Martin was a Jew and that “Allah killed him.”

The next day Bolsen used Steiner’s credit cards to buy $20,000 worth of electronics. Shortly thereafter he placed Steiner’s corpse in a suitcase and drove to Oman, hoping to escape using the dead man’s passport. Changing his mind on the way, he hid the body at the side of the road, covering it with dirt, then drove back to Sharjah. For the next 10 days nothing happened. But then video footage implicated Bolsen in the crime, and he was arrested. On June 25, he led police to the body. On Oct. 23, 2007, a local court sentenced him to death.

He attempted — unsuccessfully at first — to offer “blood money” (a form of compensation allowed under UAE law) to Steiner’s family to win his freedom. Reports on the trial in the local press included exaggerated stories of Bolsen posing as a gay man on social media, entering the UAE on a forged British passport, marrying a second wife (a British woman from Somalia), or attempting to use money from a sex business to finance Al Qaeda. In prison Bolsen became an imam and launched a Quran competition for other inmates on death row. His story was picked up by several Islamic forums, and sympathizers launched a website that pleaded for leniency in his case. (His wife and children have since moved back to Colorado, where they live today.)


Why was she allowed back in the U.S.?

Much more at the link above.

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